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Deborah Allen

Deborah Allen is on leave from the University of Delaware to serve in the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education, where she is a Program Director for the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship program, and for the Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological & Mathematical Sciences (UBM), Course, Curriculum & Laboratory Improvement (CCLI), Research Coordination Networks–Undergraduate Biology Education (RCN-UBE), and Scholarships in Science Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) programs. Before joining DUE, Allen served as PI of a NSF-funded Teacher Professional Continuum project, and continues to collaborate with the project's team of science and science education faculty who study pre-service teachers' progress through a reform-based teacher preparation program, and who co-teach courses for students in that program. Allen serves on the editorial board of CBE-Life Sciences Education and has co-authored a regularly-featured column on teaching strategies for that journal. She is the author of Transformations: Approaches to College Science Teaching (W.H. Freeman's Scientific Teaching Series, 2009).


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Fraser Armstrong

Fraser Armstrong, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Oxford and Fellow of St John’s College, Oxford, obtained his BSc and PhD at the University of Leeds.  Before moving to Oxford in 1993 he was Associate Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Irvine.  He carries out research on the mechanisms of biological redox reactions involving transition metals and has developed a suite of electrochemical techniques called Protein Film Electrochemistry to investigate complex electron transfer and catalytic reactions in enzymes.  He is particularly interested in how metalloenzymes are so efficient in catalysing redox conversions of hydrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide, an area that has important implications for future renewable energy.  In 2008 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.  He has received many awards, including the 2010 Joseph Chatt Award of the Royal Society of Chemistry (bioinorganic chemistry), the 2012 Barker Medal (electrochemistry) and the 2012 Davy Medal of the Royal Society.


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Peter Atkins

Peter Atkins is a fellow of Lincoln College in the University of Oxford and the author of about 70 books for students and a general audience. His texts are market leaders around the globe. A frequent lecturer in the United States and throughout the world, he has held visiting professor­ships in France, Israel, Japan, China, and New Zealand. He was the founding chairman of the Committee on Chemistry Education of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry and was a member of IUPAC’s Physical and Biophysical Chemistry Division.


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Janelle M. Bailey

Janelle M. Bailey, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Science Education in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.  Her research interests include identifying and measuring change in students' knowledge about astronomy topics, the teaching and learning of science, and the effectiveness of professional development for science teachers.  She teaches courses in science education, including methods and research courses, for both undergraduate and graduate students.  She is the past Chair of the American Association of Physics Teachers' Space Science and Astronomy Committee.  Dr. Bailey earned her B.A. in Astrophysics from Agnes Scott College and her M.Ed. in Science Education from the University of Georgia.  Her Ph.D. is from the University of Arizona's Department of Teaching and Teacher Education, where she studied undergraduates' conceptual understanding of stars and star properties.


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Colin Baird

Colin Baird is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Western Ontario.   He has received the University's Edward G. Pleva Teaching Award and a national 3M Teaching Fellowship Award.


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Jeremy M. Berg

JEREMY M. BERG received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Chemistry from Stanford (where he did research with Keith Hodgson and Lubert Stryer) and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Harvard with Richard Holm. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship with Carl Pabo in Biophysics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Johns Hopkins from 1986 to 1990. He then moved to Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as Professor and Director of the Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, where he remained until 2003. He then became Director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. In 2011, he moved to the University of Pittsburgh where he is now Professor of Computational and Systems Biology and Pittsburgh Foundation Chair and Director of the Institute for Personalized Medicine. He served as President of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from 2011-2013. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He received the American Chemical Society Award in Pure Chemistry (1994) and the Eli Lilly Award for Fundamental Research in Biological Chemistry (1995), was named Maryland Outstanding Young Scientist of the Year (1995), received the Harrison Howe Award (1997), and received public service awards from the Biophysical Society, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the American Chemical Society, and the American Society for Cell Biology. He also received numerous teaching awards, including the W. Barry Wood Teaching Award (selected by medical students), the Graduate Student Teaching Award, and the Professor’s Teaching Award for the Preclinical Sciences. He is coauthor, with Stephen J. Lippard, of the textbook Principles of Bioinorganic Chemistry.


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Janet L. Branchaw

Janet Branchaw is a Faculty Associate at the University of Wisconsin--Madison's Center for Biology Education.  She earned her B.S. in Zoology from Iowa State University and her Ph.D. in Physiology from the University of Wisconsin--Madison.  After completing postdoctoral training and a lectureship in undergraduate and medical physiology at the University of Wisconsin--Madison's School of Medicine and Public Health, Janet joined the University's Center for Biology Education.  Her work at the Center focuses on developing and supporting undergraduate students for graduate school.  She developed and directs two National Science Foundation--funded undergraduate research programs; a 10-week summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates program that hosts students from around the country, and a three-year Undergraduate Research and Mentoring program that prepares students in science, technology, engineering, and math disciplines for interdisciplinary graduate training across the biological sciences.  In connection with this work she collaborates with the Delta Program for Research, Teaching and Learning and the Wisconsin Program for Scientific Teaching to train pre-faculty and faculty mentors of undergraduate researchers.  In addition to her work in undergraduate research, Janet also teaches introductory biology.


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Julio de Paula

Julio de Paula is a Professor of Chemistry at Lewis and Clark College. A native of Brazil, Professor de paula received a B.A. degree in chemistry from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and a Ph.D. in biophysical chemistry from Yale University.  His research activities encompass the areas of molecular spectroscopy, biophysical chemistry, and nanoscience.  He has taught courses in general chemistry, physical chemistry, biophysical chemistry, instrumental analysis and writing.


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Displaying 1-15 of 59