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Deborah Allen

Deborah Allen is on leave from the University of Delaware to serve in the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education, where she is a Program Director for the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship program, and for the Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological & Mathematical Sciences (UBM), Course, Curriculum & Laboratory Improvement (CCLI), Research Coordination Networks–Undergraduate Biology Education (RCN-UBE), and Scholarships in Science Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) programs. Before joining DUE, Allen served as PI of a NSF-funded Teacher Professional Continuum project, and continues to collaborate with the project's team of science and science education faculty who study pre-service teachers' progress through a reform-based teacher preparation program, and who co-teach courses for students in that program. Allen serves on the editorial board of CBE-Life Sciences Education and has co-authored a regularly-featured column on teaching strategies for that journal. She is the author of Transformations: Approaches to College Science Teaching (W.H. Freeman's Scientific Teaching Series, 2009).


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Fraser Armstrong

Fraser Armstrong, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Oxford and Fellow of St John’s College, Oxford, obtained his BSc and PhD at the University of Leeds.  Before moving to Oxford in 1993 he was Associate Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Irvine.  He carries out research on the mechanisms of biological redox reactions involving transition metals and has developed a suite of electrochemical techniques called Protein Film Electrochemistry to investigate complex electron transfer and catalytic reactions in enzymes.  He is particularly interested in how metalloenzymes are so efficient in catalysing redox conversions of hydrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide, an area that has important implications for future renewable energy.  In 2008 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.  He has received many awards, including the 2010 Joseph Chatt Award of the Royal Society of Chemistry (bioinorganic chemistry), the 2012 Barker Medal (electrochemistry) and the 2012 Davy Medal of the Royal Society.


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Peter Atkins

Peter Atkins is a fellow of Lincoln College in the University of Oxford and the author of about 70 books for students and a general audience. His texts are market leaders around the globe. A frequent lecturer in the United States and throughout the world, he has held visiting professor­ships in France, Israel, Japan, China, and New Zealand. He was the founding chairman of the Committee on Chemistry Education of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry and was a member of IUPAC’s Physical and Biophysical Chemistry Division.


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