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Kimberley Waldron

Dr. Kimberley Waldron is professor of chemistry at Regis University in Denver, Colorado, where, in addition to lower division courses for nonmajors and majors, she teaches advanced courses in the fields of inorganic and biological chemistry.  Dr. Waldron received her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Virginia and her doctoral degree in inorganic chemistry from Virginia Commonwealth University. After graduating, she worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the California Institute of Technology in the area of bioinorganic chemistry.  In 1995, she joined the faculty at Regis University as a Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor of Chemistry.


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Christopher Walsh

Professor Walsh is currently the Hamilton Kuhn Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. He is one of the leading enzymologists in the world. He has elucidated the catalytic mechanisms of a wide variety of enzymes including flavoproteins and other redox enzymes. He has also pioneered the design of mechanism-based enzyme inhibitors (or "suicide" substrates). His work has found practical application in the design of antibacterial agents, anticonvulsive agents, plant growth regulators, and antitumor drugs. His current focus is on the biosynthesis and mechanism of action of antibiotics and bacterial siderophores. He has published over 600 scientific articles and his book, Enzymatic Reaction Mechanisms, has educated generations of enzymologists.

Professor Walsh's accomplishments have been recognized through numerous awards which include the Eli Lilly Award in Biochemistry, the Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award in Organic Chemistry, the Repligen Award in Biological Chemistry, and the Alfred Bader Award in Bioorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


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Mary Pat Wenderoth

Dr. Mary Pat Wenderoth is a Principal Lecturer in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington and teaches upper division animal physiology courses. She is a member of the University of Washington Biology Education Research Group, a group of twenty to thirty faculty, post-docs, graduate students, and undergraduate students who meet weekly to discuss the impact of innovative active learning practices on student learning. Dr. Wenderoth won the University of Washington Distinguished Teaching Award in 2001 and is a member o of the University of Washington Teaching Academy. Dr. Wenderoth has been involved with the faculty development efforts of the National Academies Scientific Teaching Alliance, NASTA) since 2006 and continues to be involved with the new regional summer institutes that began in 2011. In 2010, Dr. Wenderoth co-founded the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER). SABER is a national network of faculty, post-docs, and graduate students who are conducting hypothesis-driven research in an effort to create a body of evidence-based teaching practices for undergraduate biology courses.


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Donald J. Wink

Donald J. Wink is Professor and former Head in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Prior to that he was an assistant professor at New York University engaged in research in theoretical, synthetic, and applied organometallic chemistry. His current projects are diverse but share a theme of crossing boundaries, often using student pathways as a source of inspiration and direction. This included much work in conjunction with community college faculty, something that continues today with his participation in an NSF Undergraduate Research Center project, the Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education. In the late 1990's, inspired in part by discussions at F21 meetings, he turned to working with teachers and K-12 classrooms in similar outreach and collaboration projects. This now includes work on the "Inquiry to Build Content" project in the Chicago Public Schools, a comprehensive curriculum and professional design effort in conjunction with Loyola University.


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Michelle Withers

Michelle Withers is an Associate Professor in Biology at West Virginia University. Her research focuses on improving undergraduate science education, particularly evaluating the efficacy of different teaching methods in enhancing student learning. Another major focus of her program is training faculty and future faculty in scientific teaching. She runs the eh National Academies Summer Institute at West Virginia University, a regional offshoot of the National Academies Summer Institute on Undergraduate Biology Education (NASI). She serves as the Director for the National Academies Scientific Teaching Alliance (NASTA), and on the executive board of the Biology Director's Consortium (BDC), and is a founding member of the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER). She graduated with a BS in Public Health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and received her PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Arizona, Tucson.


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