Displaying 1-13 of 13

Austin Jackson

Austin Jackson is an assistant professor in the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities at Michigan State University. His research and teaching interests include writing and rhetoric, African American Language and literacy, and qualitative research in English education. He serves as Director of the My Brother’s Keeper’s Program, a mentoring program for middle school students attending the Paul Robeson - Malcolm X Academy (K – 8th grade) in Detroit, MI. He has co-authored several publications exploring links between critical approaches to writing pedagogy and student participation in contemporary struggles for critical democracy.


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Margaret C. C. Jacob

Margaret C. Jacob (PhD, Cornell University) is distinguished professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles. She has published widely on science, religion, the Enlightenment, freemasonry, and the origins of the Industrial Revolution. Her first book, The Newtonians and the English Revolution (1976), won the Gottschalk Prize from the American Society for Eighteenth Century Studies. Her most recent monograph is Strangers Nowhere in the World: The Rise of Cosmopolitanism in Early Modern Europe (2006). She is currently at work on a book about the first knowledge economy.


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Lee A. Jacobus

Lee A. Jacobus is professor emeritus of English at the University of Connecticut and the author/editor of popular English and drama textbooks, among them the full and compact versions of The Bedford Introduction to Drama, Sixth Edition (Bedford/St. Martin's, 2009); and The Longman Anthology of American Drama. He has written scholarly books on Paradise Lost, on the works of John Cleveland, and on the works of Shakespeare, including Shakespeare and the Dialectic of Certainty. He is also a playwright and author of fiction. Two of his plays — Fair Warning and Long Division — were produced in New York by the American Theater of Actors, and Dance Therapy, three one-act plays, was produced in New York at Where Eagles Dare Theatre.  He has recently written a book of short stories, Volcanic Jesus, which is set in Hawaii.


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Carol Jago

Carol Jago has taught English in middle and high school for thirty-two years and directs the California Reading and Literature Project at UCLA. She is currently president of the National Council of Teachers of English. Jago served as AP Literature content advisor for the College Board and now serves on their English Academic Advisory committee. She has published six books with Heinemann, including With Rigor for All and Papers, Papers, Papers. She has also published four books on contemporary multicultural authors for NCTE’s High School Literature series. Carol was an education columnist for the Los Angeles Times, and her essays have appeared in English Journal, Language Arts, NEA Today, as well as in other newspapers across the nation. She edits the journal of the California Association of Teachers of English, California English, and served on the planning committee for the 2009 NAEP Reading Framework and the 2011 NAEP Writing Framework.


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Henry James

Henry James (1843-1916) was an iconic figure of nineteenth century literature. Among his many masterpieces are The Portrait of a Lady, The Bostonians, The Europeans, The Golden Bowl, and Washington Square. As well as fiction, James produced several works of travel literature and biography, and was one of the great letter writers of any age. A contemporary and friend of Robert Louis Stevenson, Edith Wharton, and Joseph Conrad, James continues to exert a major influence on generations of novelists and writers.


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Michael P. Johnson

Michael P. Johnson (Ph.D., Stanford University) is professor of history at Johns Hopkins University. His publications include Toward a Patriarchal Republic: The Secession of Georgia; Abraham Lincoln, Slavery, and the Civil War: Selected Speeches and Writings; and Reading the American Past: Selected Historical Documents, the documents reader for The American Promise. He has also coedited No Chariot Let Down: Charleston’s Free People of Color on the Eve of the Civil War with James L. Roark.


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T. R. Johnson

T. R. Johnson has directed the writing program at Tulane University since 2004. He is the author of A Rhetoric of Pleasure: Prose Style and Today's Composition Classroom and the coeditor with Tom Pace of Refiguring Prose Style: Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy. He hosts a weekly radio program devoted to contemporary jazz every Tuesday at 4:00 p.m. CST at www.wwoz.org.  He has taught at Boston University, the University of New Orleans, and the University of Louisville. His work has appeared College English, JAC, and College Composition and Communication.


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Linck Johnson

Linck Johnson (BA, Cornell University; PhD, Princeton University), the Charles A. Dana Professor of English at Colgate University, has taught courses in writing and American literature and culture since 1974. He is the author of Thoreau's Complex Weave: The Writing of "A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers," with the Text of the First Draft, the Historical Introduction to A Week in the Princeton University Press edition of The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau, and numerous articles and contributions to books. The recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship at the American Antiquarian Society, he is a member of the Editorial Board of the Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson and ESQ: A Journal of the American Renaissance.


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Jay Jordan

Jay Jordan is Assistant Professor of English in the University Writing Program at the University of Utah, where he coordinates first-year composition. His research interests include second language writing, English as an international language, rhetoric and design, and histories of rhetoric. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on writing, writing pedagogy, and rhetorical theory and history. He has published in CCC, College English, and Rhetoric Review, and his work has appeared in several edited collections. He is coeditor of Second Language Writing in the Composition Classroom: A Critical Sourcebook (Bedford/St. Martin’s) and of Reinventing Identities in Second Language Writing (NCTE). He is currently finishing a book manuscript on how second language writers negotiate curricula in typical US composition courses. He is active in CCCC and NCTE.


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Chris Juzwiak

Chris Juzwiak holds an MA in Comparative Literature from the University of California, Los Angeles, and is ABD. He has taught college-level literature and composition for twenty-three years and is currently chair of the Developmental Composition Program at Glendale Community College. Under the auspices of grants from the Carnegie and Hewlett Foundations and the California Basic Skills Initiative, Chris has pioneered new pedagogical approaches to development composition instruction. He is coauthor of “Pedagogies of Visibility: The Full E-mersion and Beyond,” an article in the spring 2009 edition of New Directions for Community Colleges. In addition, Chris has presented his work at ISSOTL, the League for Innovation, ECCTYC, Strengthening Student Success, the California State Academic Senate, and the Carnegie and Hewlett Foundations. At Glendale College, he has received the John Craven Award for innovative composition instruction and in 2010, the Distinguished Faculty Award. His latest project, IMPACT (Incremental-Motivational Pedagogy, Assessment-Cycles Training), is a distillation of ten years of pedagogical research and innovation, and is now used in all the developmental composition classes at his college.


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Displaying 1-13 of 13