Displaying 16-30 of 40

John Grotzinger

John Grotzinger is a field geologist interested in the evolution of the Earth's surface environments and biosphere.  His research addresses the chemical development of the early oceans and atmosphere, the environmental context of early animal evolution, and the geologic factors that regulate sedimentary basins.  He has contributed to developing the basic geologic framework of a number of sedimentary basins and orogenic belts in northwestern Canada, northen Siberia, southern Africa, and the western United States.  He received his B.S. in geoscience from Hobart College in 1979, an M.S. in geology from the University of Montana in 1981, and a Ph.D. in geology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1985.  He spent three years as a research scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory before joinning the MIT faculty in 1988.  From 1979 to 1990, he was engaged in regional mapping for the Geological Survey of Canada.  He currently works as a geologist on the Mars Exploration Rover team, the first mission to conduct ground-based exploration of the bedrock geology of another planet, which has resulted in the discovery sedimentary rocks formed in aqueous depositional environments.  In 1998, Dr. Grotzinger was named the Waldemar Lindgren Distinguished Scholar at MIT, and in 2000 he became the Robert R. Schrock Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences.  In 2005, he moved from MIT to Caltech, where he is the Fletcher Jones Professor of Geology.  He received the Presidential Young Investigator Award of the National Science Foundation in 1990, the Donath Medal of the Geological Society of America in 1992, and the Henno Martin Medal of the Geological Society of Namibia in 2001.  He is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences.


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Thomas H. Jordan

Thomas H. Jordan is director of the Southern California Earthquake Center,
University Professor, and W. M. Keck Foundation Professor of Earth Sciences at the University of Southern California. As SCEC’s principal investigator since 2002, he has overseen all aspects of its program in earthquake system science, which currently involves over 600 scientists at more than 60 universities and research institutions worldwide (http://www.scec.org). The center’s mission is to develop comprehensive understanding of earthquakes and use this scientific knowledge to reduce earthquake risk. Jordan established SCEC’s Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability and has been the lead SCEC investigator on projects to create and improve a timedependent, uniform California earthquake rupture forecast. He currently chairs the International Commission on Earthquake Forecasting for Civil Protection (appointed by the Italian government), is a member of the California Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council, and has served on the Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee of the U. S. Geological Survey. He was elected to the Council of the U. S. National Academy of Sciences in 2006 and has served on its executive committee. He was appointed to the Governing Board of the National Research Council in 2008. Jordan’s research is focused on system-level models of earthquake processes, earthquake forecasting and forecast-evaluation, and full-3D waveform tomography. His other interests include continental formation and tectonic evolution, mantle dynamics,
and statistical descriptions of geologic phenomena. He is an author on approximately 190 scientific publications, including two popular textbooks. He chaired the NRC panels that produced two decadal reports, Living on an Active Earth: Perspectives on Earthquake Science (2003) and Basic Research Opportunities in Earth Sciences (2002). Jordan received his B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. (1972) from the California Institute of Technology. He taught at Princeton University and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography before joining the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) as the Robert R. Shrock Professor in 1984. He served as the head of MIT’s Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences for the decade 1988-1998. In 2000, he moved from MIT to USC, and in 2004, he was appointed as a USC University Professor. He has
been awarded the Macelwane and Lehmann Medals of the American Geophysical Union and the Woollard Award of the Geological Society of America. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society.


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Karen M. Kortz

Karen Kortz has been teaching a variety of introductory geoscience classes at the Community College of Rhode Island for ten years and received the 2008 Biggs Award for Excellence in Earth Science Teaching. Karen received her Ph.D. from the University of Rhode Island, her M.S. from Brown University, and B.A. from Pomona College, all in geology. Her research interests include geoscience education research, and in particular, students' conceptions of rocks and plate tectonics and ways to reduce their misconceptions. Karen has led multiple workshops, both on national and local levels, on student misconceptions and teaching pedagogy.


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John A. Luczaj

John Luczaj is a field geologist interested in sedimentology, geochemistry, and hydrogeology, specializing in diagenesis in sedimentary systems.  He has conducted research on hydrothermal dolomitization, fluid-inclusions in minerals, groundwater geochemistry and aquifer recovery, geologic mapping, geomorphology, and Holocene cave deposits.  One of his important contributions was the first successful dating of diagenetic dolomite using the U-Pb method.
He received a B.S. in geology from the University of Wisconsin – Oshkosh in 1993, an M.S. in geology from the University of Kansas in 1995, and a Ph.D. in geology from Johns Hopkins University in 2000.  He worked as a USGS-NAGT Summer Trainee at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1993, as a visiting assistant professor at Towson University (1999-2000) and Western Michigan University (2000-2002), and as an environmental consultant from 2002-2005 before joining the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.  He is currently chair of the Geoscience unit in the Department of Natural & Applied Sciences at UW-Green Bay.  In conjunction with the Wisconsin Geological & Natural History Survey, he completed a county-wide bedrock geologic mapping project in 2011.
Dr. Luczaj teaches courses in physical geology, historical geology, sedimentology & stratigraphy, glacial geology, regional field geology, and radioactivity.  His current research focuses on the groundwater chemistry of confined aquifer systems in eastern Wisconsin, the diagenesis of sedimentary rocks, including petroleum reservoirs, and he has recently completed a review article on the geology of the Niagara escarpment in Wisconsin.  He received the Vincent E. Nelson Award in 2001 from the American Association of Petroleum Geologists for his work on hydrothermal dolomitization.


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Bill McKibben

Bill McKibben is the author of more than a dozen books, including The End of Nature, Eaarth, and Deep Economy. He is the founder of the environmental organization 350.org and was among the first to warn of the dangers of global warming. He is the Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the 2013 winner of the Gandhi Peace Award.


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Kirsten Menking

Kirsten Menking is an environmental Earth scientist in the Department of Earth Science and Geography at Vassar College. Her research interests include using lake sediments to unravel Earth’s history of climatic change, linking this history to atmospheric and hydrologic processes through a combination of numerical modeling experiments and collection of weather and stream discharge data, analyzing the evolution of landforms in response to climatic and tectonic processes, and studying the impacts of urbanization on streams. She has published journal articles documenting glacial–interglacial cycles in the Sierra Nevada mountains and adjacent Owens Valley of California, determined the climatic conditions necessary to produce a Pleistocene lake in the now-dry Estancia Basin of New Mexico, and un-covered a centuries-long mid-Holocene drought in New York’s Hudson River valley. Her current research involves quantifying the amount of road salt entering the groundwater system,a topic of concern both for people dependent on well water and for aquatic ecosystems.


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Dorothy Merritts

Dorothy Merritts is a geologist with expertise on streams, rivers, and the impact of humans and geologic hazards on landscape evolution. In the western United States, she conducted research on the San Andreas Fault of coastal California, and her international work focuses on fault movements in South Korea, Indonesia, Australia, and Costa Rica. Her primary research in the eastern United States is in the Appalachian Mountains and Piedmont, particularly in the mid-Atlantic region, where she is investigating the role of climate change and human activities in transforming the valley bottom landscapes and waterways of Eastern North America. Recently she partnered with other scientists and policy makers from multiple state and national government agencies to develop and test a new approach to stream and wetland restoration. She is a professor in the Department of Earth and Environment at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She is an author or co-author of more than 70 scientific articles, and the editor and contributing writer for numerous scientific books and field guides.


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Arnold I. Miller

Arnold I. Miller is Professor in the Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati. A unifying thread in Miller’s research is an interest in biodiversity throughout geological time and in the present day. Currently, a central focus of his work is the interpretation of major changes in global biodiversity during the history of life, including brief intervals of time when global biodiversity dramatically decreased (mass extinctions) or increased (radiations). Recently, he has been collaborating with colleagues in the Departments of Biology and Geography in an investigation of the effects of urbanization on the distribution and abundance of plant species in urban-to-rural settings.


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Eldridge M. Moores

Eldridge Moores (B.S. (with honor) Caltech 1959, Ph.D. Princeton 1963, D.Sc. (honorary) College of Wooster 1994) is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Geology at UC Davis (he has been a faculty member there since 1966).  He is a tectonicist/structural geologist.  He has over 100 peer-reviewed publications including several books, focusing mostly on (1) ophiolites (fragments of oceanic crust and mantle preserved in mountain belts); (2) the tectonics of California and neighboring regions; (3) tectonics of mountain ranges around the world; (4) Precambrian tectonics; and (5) public awareness of geology.  He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Geological Society of America, an Honorary Fellow of the Geological Society of London, and a Member of the American Geophysical Union.  He received the first Geological Association of Canada Medal in 1994, was 1996 President of the Geological Society of America, and  2004-2008 Vice President of the International Union of Geological Sciences  A UC Davis student resident hall is named for him.  Moores was prominently featured in New Yorker writer John McPhee's best-selling book Assembling California (1993), and as part of the McPhee's Pulitzer Prize-winning Annals of the Former World (1999).


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Brent Owens

Brent E. Owens is Professor and Chair of the Department of Geology at the College of William and Mary. He received his B.S. from the University of Kentucky, his M.S. from the University of Massachusetts, and his Ph.D. from Washington University in St. Louis. His research interests are in mineralogy, petrology, and Precambrian geology, with most of his work on Proterozoic igneous rocks.


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Bernard W. Pipkin

Dr. Bernard Pipkin, Ph.D. is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Southern California. He has authored three books and many professional papers in environmental geology, received the AA award for teaching excellence and hosted the Emmy-winning series, Oceanus.


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Donald R. Prothero

Donald R. Prothero is Professor of Geology at Occidental College in Los Angeles and Lecturer in Geobiology at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. He earned a Ph.D. in geological sciences from Columbia University. Prothero is the author, co-author, editor, or co-editor of 22 books and over 200 scientific papers.  He is on the editorial board of Skeptic magazine, and has served as an associate or technical editor for Geology, Paleobiology, and Journal of Paleontology.  He is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America, the Paleontology Society, and the Linnaean Society of London, and has also received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Science Foundation.  In 1991, he received the Schuchert Award from the Paleontology Society for the outstanding paleontologist under the age of 40.  He has been featured on several television documentaries, including Paleoworld and Walking with Prehistoric Beasts.


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Rick Relyea

RICK RELYEA is Professor of Biology at the University of Pittsburgh, where he has been on the faculty since 1999. In 2005, he was named the Chancellor’s Distinguished Researcher at the University of Pittsburgh. Professor Rick Relyea is a recipient of the University of Pittsburgh’s 2014 Tina and David Bellet Teaching Excellence. Since 2007, he has also served as the director of the University of Pittsburgh's field station, the Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology, where he oversees a diverse set of ecological field courses and facilitates researchers from around the world. Rick has taught thousands of undergraduate students in introductory ecology, behavioral ecology, and evolution. His research is recognized throughout the world and has been published in the leading eco¬logical journals including Ecology, Ecology Letters, American Naturalist, and PNAS. The research spans a wide range of ecological and evolutionary topics including animal behavior, sexual selection, ecotoxicology, disease ecology, phenotypic plasticity, community ecology, ecosystem ecology, and landscape ecology. Rick's research focuses on aquatic habitats and the diversity of species that live in these ecosystems. He strives to integrate different areas of ecology in ways that provide new discoveries and applications.


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Displaying 16-30 of 40