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John Aberth

John Aberth lives in Roxbury, Vermont, and teaches history at Vermont's Castleton State College, where he formerly served as associate academic dean. He has taught history at a number of other institutions, including Middlebury College, the University of Vermont, St. Michael's College, the University of Nebraska, and Norwich University. He received his PhD in Medieval History from Cambridge University in England, and has published several books, including Churchmen in the Age of Edward III: The Case of Bishop Thomas de Lisle (1996); From the Brink of the Apocalypse: Confronting Famine, War, Plague and Death (2000); and A Knight at the Movies: Medieval History on Film (2003).


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Robert H. Abzug

Robert H. Abzug (Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley) is Professor of History and American Studies, Audre and Bernard Rapoport Regents Chair of Jewish Studies, and founding director of the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. His research and teaching interests focus on American cultural history, history of psychology and religion, and the history of the Holocaust. His major publications include Cosmos Crumbling: American Reform and the Religious Imagination;  Inside the Vicious Heart: Americans and the Liberation of Nazi Concentration Camps; and Passionate Liberator: Theodore Dwight Weld and the Dilemma of Reform.


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Shawn Alexander

Shawn Leigh Alexander (Ph.D., University of Massachusetts) is associate professor and graduate director of African and African American Studies and director of the Langston Hughes Center at the University of Kansas, where he specializes in African American social and intellectual history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The author of An Army of Lions: The Struggle for Civil Rights before the NAACP, he has also edited an anthology of T. Thomas Fortune's writings, T. Thomas Fortune, the Afro-American Agitator and written the Introduction to a reprint of William Sinclair's classic 1905 study, The Aftermath of Slavery: A Study of the Condition and Environment of the American Negro. He has also authored many scholarly articles and book chapters on early African American civil rights activity and black intellectual history.


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Robert J. Allison

Robert J. Allison is Professor of History at Suffolk University in Boston and also teaches history at the Harvard Extension School. He graduated from the Harvard Extension School with an ALB before earning a PhD in the History of American Civilization at Harvard in 1992. Allison received the Harvard Extension School's Petra Shattuck Distinguished Teaching Award in 1997, the Suffolk University Student Government Association's Distinguished Faculty Award in 2006, and the Suffolk University Outstanding Faculty Award in 2007.  His books include The Crescent Obscured: The United States and the Muslim World, 1776–1815 (2000); A Short History of Boston (2004); Stephen Decatur, American Naval Hero (2005); The Boston Massacre (2006); The Boston Tea Party (2007); and A Short History of Cape Cod (2010).  For The Teaching Company, he  taped the thirty-six lecture series, “Before 1776:  Life in Colonial America,” (2009). He has edited books on American history spanning from the colonial period to the twentieth century. Allison was a consultant to the Commonwealth Museum at the State Archives in Boston, and he is on the board of overseers of the USS Constitution Museum in Charlestown, Massachusetts. He is vice president of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, an elected fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, and president of the South Boston Historical Society.


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Jo Ann Argersinger

Jo Ann E. Argersinger (PhD, George Washington University) is a professor of history at Southern Illinois University, where she teaches courses on World War II, the Cold War, and labor in the United States, including a history of women and work.  She is the author of Making the Amalgamated: Gender, Ethnicity, and Class in the Baltimore Clothing Industry (1999) and Toward a New Deal in Baltimore: People and Government in the Great Depression (1988).  She is the coauthor of Twentieth-Century America: A Social and Political History (2005) and of The American Journey (Sixth Edition, 2010).  She is currently writing a book on public housing and transnational perspectives, and her article entitled "Contested Visions of American Democracy: Citizenship, Public Housing, and the International Arena" is forthcoming in the Journal of Urban History.  She will appear in a PBS documentary on the Triangle Fire, scheduled to air in March 2011, marking the hundredth anniversary of the fire.


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David Armitage

David Armitage is the Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History at Harvard University, USA. He is the author of The Declaration of Independence: A Global History and Foundations of Modern International Thought, and co-editor of The British Atlantic World, 1500-1800, 2nd edition, and The Age of Revolutions in Global Context, c. 1760-1840. 


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Catherine Armstrong

Catherine Armstrong is Senior Lecturer in American History at Manchester Metropolitan University, UK. She is the author of Landscape and Identity in North America's Southern Colonies 1660-1745.


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Eric Arnesen

Eric Arnesen is professor of History at The George Washington University. A specialist in African American labor history and issues of race and labor, he is the author of Brotherhoods of Color: Black Railroad Workers and the Struggle for Equality (2001), which received the Wesley-Logan Prize in Diaspora History from the American Historical Association and the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History, won Distinguished Honors from the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award Committee, and was selected as an Outstanding Academic Book by Choice. His book Waterfront Workers of New Orleans: Race, Class, and Politics, 1863–1923 (1991) received the John H. Dunning Prize in American History from the American Historical Association. He is the author of Historically Speaking and The Journal of the Historical Society and is coeditor of Labor Histories: Class, Politics, and the Working-Class Experience (1998). His numerous articles have appeared in journals such as the American Historical Review, International Labor and Working-Class History, International Review of Social History, Labor History, and the Radical History Review. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the University of Illinois at Chicago's Institute for the Humanities and Great Cities Institute.  In 2006, he held the Distinguished Fulbright Chair at the Swedish Institute for North American Studies at Uppsala University in Sweden.


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Jean H. Baker

Jean H. Baker is a professor of history at Goucher College. She is the author of several books, including The Stevensons, Mary Todd Lincoln, Margaret Sanger, and Sisters: The Lives of America's Suffragists. She lives in Baltimore, Maryland.


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James M. Banner, Jr.

James M. Banner Jr. is an independent historian in Washington, D.C., whose scholarly interests have focused on the history of the United States between 1765 and 1865. A leader in the creation of the National History Center and cofounder and codirector of the History News Service, he is currently writing a book about what it means to be a historian today. He is most recently the coeditor, with John R. Gillis, of Becoming Historians (University of Chicago Press, 2009).


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Alison Bashford

Alison Bashford is Vere Harmsworth Professor of Imperial and Naval History at the University of Cambridge, UK. She has taught Pacific and Australian history at the University of Sydney, Australia, and Harvard University, USA. She is the author of, most recently, Global Population: History, Geopolitics and Life on Earth, and co-editor of The Cambridge History of Australia.


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Mia Bay

Mia Bay (Ph.D., Yale University) is Professor of History at Rutgers University and the Director of the Rutgers Center for Race and Ethnicity. Her publications include To Tell the Truth Freely: The Life of Ida B. Wells and The White Image in the Black Mind: African-American Ideas about White People, 1830-1925. She is a recipient of the Alphonse Fletcher Sr. Fellowship and the National Humanities Center Fellowship. Currently, she is at work on a book examining the social history of segregated transportation and a study of African American views on Thomas Jefferson.


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Michael G. Baylor

Michael G. Baylor (Ph.D. Stanford University) is professor of history at Lehigh University, where he specializes in the history of early modern Europe and the social and cultural history of Germany at the time of the Reformation. His works include Revelations and Revolution: Basic Writings of Thomas Müntzer, The Radical Reformation, and Action and Person: Conscience in Late Scholasticism and the Young Luther, as well as a chapter on political thought during the Reformation for the Oxford Handbook of the History of Political Philosophy and numerous articles on the Reformation in Germany.


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Displaying 1-15 of 246