Displaying 1-9 of 9

Dan Cervone

Daniel Cervone is professor of psychology at the University of Chicago, where he has spent his entire career. He earned his B.A. at Oberlin College and his PhD from Stanford University (a student of Albert Bandura). He has held visiting faculty positions at the University of Washington and the University of Rome ‘La Sapeinza,’ and has been a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.
In addition to introductory psychology, Dan teaches personality psychology, social cognition, and research methods. He is graduate advisor to doctoral students in social/personality and clinical psychology, and serves as a Fellow in UIC’s undergraduate Honors College. 

Dan is the author of a graduate-level and undergraduate texts in personality, and co-editor of four volumes in personality science. He has published numerous scientific articles, primarily in the study of social-cognitive processes and personality. He has served serve as the Program Chairperson of the annual convention of the Association for Psychological Science on three occasions, and is the U.S.-based Chairperson of the inaugural International Convention of Psychological Science.


Visit Author's Page »

Sheila R. Cole

Sheila Cole is a former journalist who specialized in writing about families, children, development, and education. She is also a children's writer. Her most recent book offers a history of American childhood and is written for young people. She has also authored picture books, historical fiction, and novels for young adults. She participates in literacy programs for homeless adolescents.


Visit Author's Page »

Michael Cole

Michael Cole is an all-University of California Professor of Psychology, Communication, and Human Development. His home base is University of California, San Diego, where he is the Director of the Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition. For many years he spent his afternoons participating with children and undergraduates in development-enhancing after-school programs. He is an editor of the journal Mind, Culture and Activity. He has published widely on the role of culture and schooling in development, for which he has been awarded honorary degrees at Copenhagen University and the University of Helsinki. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academies of Education (of the United States and Russia).  Dr. Cole is the 2011 recipient of the Distinguished Contributions to Cultural and Contextual Factors in Child Development Award.


Visit Author's Page »

Joseph E. Comaty

Joseph E. Comaty received his M.S. in experimental psychology from Villanova University; his Ph.D. in psychology with a specialization in clinical neuropsychology from the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, in Illinois; and his postdoctoral Masters Degree in clinical psychopharmacology from Alliant University/CSPP in California. He is a licensed psychologist under the Louisiana State Board of Examiners of Psychologists (LSBEP) and a licensed medical psychologist under the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners. He retired from the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, Office of Behavioral Health in 2013 where he was the Chief Psychologist and Medical Psychologist and Director of the Division of Quality Management. He is an adjunct assistant professor in
psychology at Louisiana State University (LSU) in Baton Rouge and serves as emeritus faculty of the Southern Louisiana Internship Consortium (SLIC) in psychology at LSU. He has served as a member and chair of the LSBEP; he is a member and current chair of the RxP Designation Committee of APA, and a site reviewer for APA’s Committee on Accreditation. He is a member of the Model Act and Regulation Revision Committee for the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB). His research is in the areas of behavior therapy, pharmacology, and clinical psychopharmacology. He is the author of over 50 articles, book chapters, and presentations. He has served on federal grant review committees
and has been a reviewer for Psychiatric Services; The Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences; and the Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research.


Visit Author's Page »

Ronald J. Comer

Ronald Comer has been a professor in Princeton University’s Department of Psychology for the past 27 years and has served as Director of Clinical Psychology Studies for most of that time. He is also currently the director of the department’s undergraduate program. 

Professor Comer has received the President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at the university. His course "Abnormal Psychology" is one of the university’s most popular, and he has offered it almost every year since his arrival at Princeton.  He is also a practicing clinical psychologist and serves as a consultant to the Eden Institute for Persons with Autism and to hospitals and family practice residency programs throughout New Jersey. Additionally, he holds an adjunct position as Clinical Associate Professor of Family Medicine at the UMDNJ–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.  In addition to his abnormal psychology textbooks with Worth Publishers, Professor Comer has also published a number of journal articles in clinical psychology, social psychology, and family medicine. 
 
Professor Comer was an undergraduate at the University of Pennsylvania and a graduate student at Clark University. He currently lives in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, with his wife, Marlene, and their dog, Annie. From there, he can keep an eye on his sons—Greg, a resident of New York, and Jon, currently a Philadelphian—and on the resurgent Philadelphia sports teams with whom he grew up.


Visit Author's Page »

Ronald J. Comer

Ronald Comer has been a professor in Princeton University’s Department of Psychology for the past 27 years and has served as Director of Clinical Psychology Studies for most of that time. He is also currently the director of the department’s undergraduate program. 
         Professor Comer has received the President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at the university. His course "Abnormal Psychology" is one of the university’s most popular, and he has offered it almost every year since his arrival at Princeton.  He is also a practicing clinical psychologist and serves as a consultant to the Eden Institute for Persons with Autism and to hospitals and family practice residency programs throughout New Jersey. Additionally, he holds an adjunct position as Clinical Associate Professor of Family Medicine at the UMDNJ–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.  In addition to writing Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology, Professor Comer is the author of the textbook Abnormal Psychology, now in its fourth edition, and the co-author of Case Studies in Abnormal Psychology. He has also published a number of journal articles in clinical psychology, social psychology, and family medicine.  Professor Comer was an undergraduate at the University of Pennsylvania and a graduate student at Clark University. He currently lives in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, with his wife, Marlene, and their dog, Annie. From there, he can keep an eye on his sons—Greg, a resident of New York, and Jon, currently a Philadelphian—and on the resurgent Philadelphia sports teams with whom he grew up.


Visit Author's Page »

Mark Costanzo

Mark Costanzo received his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of California at Santa Cruz. He is a professor of psychology at Claremont McKenna College and a member of the plenary faculty at Claremont Graduate University. He has published research on a variety of law-related topics including police interrogations, false confessions, jury decision-making, sexual harassment, attorney argumentation, alternative dispute resolution, and the death penalty. He has also published research in the areas of nonverbal communication, teaching techniques, and energy conservation. Professor Costanzo is author of the books, Just Revenge: Costs and Consequences of the Death Penalty and Psychology Applied to Law. He has co-edited four books, including, Expert Psychological Testimony for the Courts and Violence and the Law.
Professor Costanzo has served as a consultant or expert witness for more than 80 criminal cases. In 2008, he was the winner of the Outstanding Teaching and Mentoring Award from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI), and in 2010, he received the Outstanding Teaching and Mentoring Award from the American Psychology-Law Society (APLS).


Visit Author's Page »

Displaying 1-9 of 9