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Geoffrey Keppel

Geoffrey Keppel was Professor Emeritus of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley.  During his 47 years at UC Berkeley, Keppel served as dean of social sciences, chair of the Department of Psychology and director of the Institute of Human Learning. His accolades include a Distinguished Teaching Award in 1993 and, at the time of his retirement in 1994, the prestigious Berkeley Citation.
Keppel’s research expanded the understanding of what causes humans to forget. Along with his mentors, UC Berkeley psychologist Leo Postman and Northwestern University psychologist Benton Underwood, Keppel demonstrated that forgetting is the result of interference from a variety of sources, including past memories, various aspects of the current memory, and new memories.
 


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Stephen B. Klein

Stephen B. Klein has been professor and head of the Department of Psychology at Mississippi State University since 1990.  He had written numerous articles on the biological basis of learning and memory and is the author of six textbooks, including Learning: Principles and Applications (McGraw-Hill).  He also coedited the two-volume text Contemporary Learning Theories (1989) and Handbook of Contemporary Learning Theories (2001), both published by Lawrence Erlbaum.


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Valerie S. Knopik

Valerie S. Knopik is Director of the Division of Behavioral Genetics at Rhode Island Hospital and Associate Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry & Human Behavior and Behavioral & Social Sciences at the Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University. She received her doctorate in Psychology from the University of Colorado, Boulder in 2000, where she worked with John DeFries and conducted research in the Colorado Learning Disabilities Research Center. She subsequently completed a fellowship in psychiatric genetics and genetic epidemiology at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis from 2000-2002 and continued as junior faculty for two years. She joined the faculty at Brown University in 2004 and holds an Adjunct Associate Professor appointment at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis. Knopik’s primary area of interest is the joint effect of genetic and environmental (specifically prenatal and early postnatal) risk factors on child and adolescent externalizing behavior, associated learning and cognitive deficits, and later substance use. She serves as Associate Editor of Behavior Genetics and Field Chief Editor of Frontiers in Behavioral and Psychiatric Genetics. Her work has been recognized by the Research Society for Alcoholism as a finalist for Enoch Gordis Research Recognition Award, the NIDA Genetics Workgroup, and she received the Fuller and Scott Early Career Award from the Behavior Genetics Association in 2007.  


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Bryan Kolb

Bryan Kolb received his Ph.D. from the Pennsylvania State University in 1973.  He conducted postdoctoral work at the University of Western Ontario and the Montreal Neurological Institute.  He moved to the University of Lethbridge in 1976, where is currently Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and holds a Board of Governors Chair in Neuroscience.  His current research examines how neurons of the cerebral cortex change in response to various factors, including hormones, experience, psychoactive drugs, neurotrophins, and injury, and how these changes are related to behavior in the normal and diseased brain.  Kolb is a Killam Fellow (Canada Council), a Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA), the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, and the Royal Society of Canada.  He is a recipient of the Hebb Prize from CPA and from the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour, and Cognitive Science (CSBBCS) and is a former president of the CSBBCS.  He is one of the theme leaders in the Canadian Stroke Network.  He is an adjunct professor at the University of British Columbia and University of Calgary, as well as the Hotchkiss Brain Institute in Calgary, Alberta.


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Stephen Kosslyn

Stephen M. Kosslyn is the Founding Dean of the Minerva Schools at KGI (Keck Graduate Institute). Previously, he served as Director of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and as Professor of Psychology at Stanford University. Kosslyn also is the former chair of the Department of Psychology, Dean of Social Science, and John Lindsley Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. He received a B.A. from UCLA and a Ph.D. from Stanford University, both in psychology. Kosslyn’s research has focused primarily on the nature of visual cognition, visual communication, and individual differences; he has authored or coauthored 14 books and over 300 papers on these topics. Kosslyn has received the following accolades: the American Psychological Association’s Boyd R. McCandless Young Scientist Award, the National Academy of Sciences Initiatives in Research Award, the Cattell Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the J-L. Signoret Prize (France). He has honorary Doctorates from the University of Caen, the University of Paris Descartes, and University of Bern. Kosslyn has been elected to Academia Rodinensis pro Remediatione (Switzerland), the Society of Experimental Psychologists, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

 


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Daniel Krauss

Daniel Krauss completed a joint degree program in psychology and law at the University of Arizona, receiving his J.D. and then his Ph.D. in clinical psychology and psychology, policy, and law. He is a professor at Claremont McKenna College, and is a plenary faculty member at Claremont Graduate University. Professor Krauss is primarily interested in the interaction of law and clinical psychology, and has published a large number of research articles and book chapters relating to clinical psychological evaluations for the courts, legal and psychological expertise, and jury decision-making. He has co-edited 3 books, and is the co-editor of, the law and public policy: psychology and the social sciences book series by the American Psychological Association (APA) Press.  Professor Krauss is licensed to practice law in Arizona, is a member of the United States Supreme Court bar, and has served as the United States Supreme Court Fellow to the U.S. Sentencing Commission. He is a licensed clinical psychologist in the state of California, and a diplomate in forensic psychology, board certified by the American Board of Professional Psychology.  In 2010, he was awarded the Early Career Research Award by the Western Psychological Association.


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