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Gerald E. McClearn

Gerald E. McClearn is Evan Pugh Professor in the College of Health and Human Devlopment at Pennsylvania State University, University Park. After receiving his doctorate from the University of Wisconsin in 1954, he taught at Yale University, Allegheny College, and the University of California, Berkeley before moving to the University of Colorado in 1965. There he founded the Institute for Behavioral Genetics in 1967. In 1981, McClearn moved to Penn State, where he has served as associate dean for research and dean of the College of Health and Human Development. He was also founding head of the Program in Biobehavioral Health and founding director of the Center for Developmental and Health Genetics. His research with colleagues at Penn State on mice has two main emphases: drug-related processes and behavioral and physiological aging. With Robert Plomin and other colleagues at Penn State and in Sweden, he has been involved for the past 17 years in large-scale studies of genetic and environmental influences on pattern and rate of aging in Swedish twins.


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Peter McGuffin

Peter McGuffin is dean of the Institute of Psychiatry (IoP), Kings College, London. He was previously director of the Medical Research Council (UK) social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre at the IoP. He graduated from Leeds University Medical School in 1972 and underwent a period of postgraduate training in internal medicine before specializing in psychiatry at the Bethlem Royal and Maudsley Hospitals, London. In 1979, he was awarded a Medical Research Council Fellowship to train in genetics at the Institute of Psychiatry in London and at Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, Missouri. During this time, he comppleted the work for his doctoral dissertation, which constituted one of the first genetic linkage studies on schizophrenia. He went on to carry out family and twin studies of depression and other psychiatric disorders, attempting to integrate the investigation of genetic and environmental influences. His current work continues with this general theme, while at the same time incorporating molecular genetic techniques and their applications in the study of both normal and abnormal behaviors. McGuffin has been president of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics since 1995 and is a founding fellow of Britain's Academy of Medical Sciences.


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Kaitlyn McLachlan

Kaitlyn McLachlan, University of Alberta Kaitlyn McLachlan is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Alberta, and a research fellow of NeuroDevNet. She has published in the area of clinical forensic psychology and does research with vulnerable populations in the criminal justice system. Dr.
McLachlan co-edited (with Ronald Roesch) an international collection of seminal publications in forensic clinical psychology.


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Eduardo Mercado

Eduardo Mercado is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at University at Buffalo, The State University of New York.  His research focuses on how different brain systems interact to develop representations of experienced events, and how these representations change over time.  Dr. Mercado currently uses techniques from experimental psychology, computational neuroscience, electrical engineering, and behavioral neuroscience to explore questions about auditory learning and memory in rodents, cetaceans, and humans.


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David S. Moore

David S. Moore is Shanti S. Gupta Distinguished Professor of Statistics, Emeritus, at Purdue University and was 1998 president of the American Statistical Association. He received his A.B. from Princeton and his Ph.D. from Cornell, both in mathematics. He has written many research papers in statistical theory and served on the editorial boards of several major journals. Professor Moore is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He has served as program director for statistics and probability at the National Science Foundation.  In recent years, Professor Moore has devoted his attention to the teaching of statistics. He was the content developer for the Annenberg/Corporation for Public Broadcasting college-level telecourse Against All Odds: Inside Statistics and for the series of video modules Statistics: Decisions through Data, intended to aid the teaching of statistics in schools. He is the author of influential articles on statistics education and of several leading texts. Professor Moore has served as president of the International Association for Statistical Education and has received the Mathematical Association of America’s national award for distinguished college or university teaching of mathematics.


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Joseph Morrissey

Joe Morrissey received his PhD in cognitive psychology from Boston University. He has held the position of Instructor of Psychology at Binghamton University since 2000 and teaches approximately 1200 students a year in core and experimental psychology courses. Joe is responsible for developing his department’s internship and distance learning programs.  He is also a Faculty Advisor to Psi Chi and a member of Binghamton University’s Advancing Learning Team.  Joe’s research background is in face perception, particularly featural vs configural disparities in cognitive processing.  He has been a frequent contributor to Worth's pedagogical offerings.


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David G. Myers

David Myers received his psychology Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. He has spent his career at Hope College, Michigan, where he has taught dozens of introductory psychology sections. Hope College students have invited him to be their commencement speaker and voted him "outstanding professor."

His research and writings have been recognized by the Gordon Allport Intergroup Relations Prize, by a 2010 Honored Scientist award from the Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences, by a 2010 Award for Service on Behalf of Personality and Social Psychology, by a 2013 Presidential Citation from APA Division 2, and by three dozen honorary doctorates.

With support from National Science Foundation grants, Myers' scientific articles have appeared in three dozen scientific periodicals, including Science, American Scientist, Psychological Science, and the American Psychologist. In addition to his scholarly writing and his textbooks for introductory and social psychology, he also digests psychological science for the general public. His writings have appeared in four dozen magazines, from Today's Education to Scientific American. He also has authored five general audience books, including The Pursuit of Happiness and Intuition: Its Powers and Perils.

David Myers has chaired his city's Human Relations Commission, helped found a thriving assistance center for families in poverty, and spoken to hundreds of college and community groups. Drawing on his experience, he also has written articles and a book (A Quiet World) about hearing loss, and he is advocating a transformation in American assistive listening technology (see www.hearingloop.org). For his leadership, he received an American Academy of Audiology Presidential Award in 2011, and the Hearing Loss Association of America Walter T. Ridder Award in 2012.

He bikes to work year-round and plays daily pick-up basketball. David and Carol Myers have raised two sons and a daughter, and have one granddaughter to whom he dedicates the Third Edition of Psychology in Everyday Life.


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Catherine E. Myers

Catherine E. Myers is a Research Professor of Psychology at Rutgers University–Newark, co-director of the Memory Disorders Project at Rutgers–Newark, and Editor-in-Chief of the project’s public health newsletter, Memory Loss and the Brain.  Her research includes both computational neuroscience and experimental psychology, and focuses on human memory, specifically on memory impairments following damage to the hippocampus and associated brain structures.  She is co-author of Gateway to Memory: An Introduction to Neural Network Modeling of the Hippocampus and Learning (MIT Press, 2001) and author of Delay Learning in Artificial Neural Networks (Chapman and Hall, 1992).


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