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Jenny Saffran

Jenny Saffran is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of
Wisconsin–Madison. Her research focuses on the learning abilities
required to master the complexities of language. Related research concerns infant music perception, and the relationship between music and language learning.


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Daniel L. Schacter

Daniel Schacter is William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. Dan received his B.A. degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He subsequently developed a keen interest in amnesic disorders associated with various kinds of brain damage. He continued his research and education at the University of Toronto, where he received his Ph.D. in 1981. He taught on the faculty at Toronto for the next six years before joining the psychology department at the University of Arizona in 1987. In 1991, he joined the faculty at Harvard University. His research explores the relation between conscious and unconscious forms of memory, the nature of distortions and errors in remembering, and how we use memory to imagine future events. Many of Schacter's studies are summarized in his 1996 book, Searching for Memory: The Brain, The Mind, and The Past, and his 2001 book, The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers, both winners of the APA's William James Book Award. Schacter has also received a number of awards for teaching and research, including the Harvard-Radcliffe Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Prize, the Warren Medal from the Society of Experimental Psychologists, and the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions from the American Psychological Association. In 2013, he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.


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Toni Schmader

Toni Schmader is a Canada Research Chair in Social Psychology at the University of British Columbia. She received her B.A. from Washington & Jefferson College in Pennsylvania before completing her Ph.D. at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Before moving to Canada in 2009, she taught at the University of Arizona for 10 years. At UBC, she was awarded the Killam Prize for excellence in research, and at the U of A she received the Magellan Prize for excellence in teaching. She is currently a member of the executive committee of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology and an Associate Editor at the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. She was drawn to research in social psychology for its ability to take a systematic empirical approach to examining important social issues and to teaching for the opportunity to share those insights with others. Her research examines how individuals are affected by and cope with tarnished identities and negative stereotypes. She has published work on topics of social identity threat, stigma and identity, stereotyping and prejudice, self-conscious emotion, and gender roles.


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Regina Schuller

Regina Schuller is a professor of psychology at York University and also holds a cross-appointment with the graduate program in Sociolegal Studies at York. She has published extensively in the area of jury decision making and is co-editor the first Canadian text for Psychology and Law courses.


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Robert S. Siegler

Robert Siegler is the Teresa Heinz Professor of Cognitive Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University.  He is the author of the cognitive development textbook Children's Thinking and has written or edited several additional books on child development.  His books have been translated into Japanese, Korean, Spanish, French, and Portuguese.  In the past few years, he has presented keynote addresses at the conventions of the Cognitive Development Society, the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development, the Japanese Psychological Association, the Eastern Psychological Association, and the Conference on Human Development.  He also served as Associate Editor of the journal Developmental Psychology, co-edited the cognitive development volume of the 2006 Handbook of Child Psychology, and served on the National Mathematics Advisory Panel from 2006-2008.  In 2005, Dr. Siegler received the American Psychological Association's Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award. 


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Richard O. Straub

Richard O. Straub is Professor of Psychology and founder of the Graduate Program in Health Psychology at the University of Michigan, Dearborn. After receiving his Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Columbia University and serving as a National Institute of Mental Health Fellow at the University of California, Irvine, Straub joined the University of Michigan faculty in 1979. Since then, he has focused on research in health psychology, especially mind-body issues in stress, cardiovascular reactivity, and the effects of exercise on physical and psychological health. Straub’s research has been published in such journals as Health Psychology, the Journal of Applied Social Psychology, and the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior
A recipient of the University of Michigan’s Distinguished Teaching Award and the Alumni Society’s Faculty Member of the Year Award, Straub is extensively involved in undergraduate and graduate medical education. In addition to serving on the Board of Directors of the Southeast Michigan Consortium for Medical Education and lecturing regularly at area teaching hospitals, Straub has created an online learning management system for medical residency programs and authored a series of web-based modules for teaching core competencies in behavioral medicine.
Straub’s interest in enhancing student learning is further reflected in the study guides, instructor’s manuals, and critical thinking materials he has developed to accompany several leading psychology texts.
Straub’s professional devotion to health psychology dovetails with his personal devotion to fitness and good health. He has completed hundreds of road races and marathons (including multiple Boston marathons, Ironman triathlons,  and the 2009 Ironman-Hawaii World Championship), and is a nationally-ranked, USAT All-American triathlete. With this text Straub combines his teaching vocation with a true passion for health psychology.


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David B Stromhetz

David B. Strohmetz,  Professor of Psychology at Monmouth University, has taught research methods and statistics courses for over 20 years at three different institutions.  It was in his first undergraduate psychology course at Dickinson College that he first discovered the thrill of scientific discovery. The research skills he developed as a psychology major led to his first job after graduation. He went on to receive his M.A. and Ph.D. in Social/Organizational Psychology from Temple University.

Seeking to promote quality teaching in the psychology major, Strohmetz has authored instructor’s manuals, test banks, and website companion material for several editions of a behavioral research textbook.  He has developed PowerPoint slide decks to accompany several editions of introductory psychology, social psychology, and developmental psychology textbooks. These slide decks incorporate pedagogical strategies to promote active learning in the classroom. His teaching-related publications and conference presentations focus on sharing innovative strategies he incorporates into his courses to promote student learning. Strohmetz is a co-founder of www.teachpsychscience.org, an internet repository of class activities and other instructor resources to support research methods and statistics.  Strohmetz is also an expert on assessment of student learning, having served as Associate Vice President for Academic and Institutional Assessment at Monmouth University.

Seeking to provide undergraduates with meaningful and engaging research experiences, Strohmetz’s Social Influence Lab focuses on social factors that influence people’s generosity, particular with respect to restaurant tipping behavior. He has also written about the “social psychology of the experiment,” discussing methodological problems and potential solutions when conducting psychological research.


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