Displaying 16-30 of 104

Daniel Cervone

Daniel Cervone is Professor of Psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he has spent his entire career. He earned his B.A. at Oberlin College and his PhD from Stanford University, where he was a student of Albert Bandura. He has held visiting faculty positions at the University of Washington and the University of Rome "La Sapienza," and has been a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.

In addition to introductory psychology, Dan teaches personality psychology, social cognition, and research methods. He is graduate advisor to doctoral students in social/personality and clinical psychology, and serves as a Fellow in UIC’s undergraduate Honors College. 

Dan is the author of a graduate-level and undergraduate texts in personality, and co-editor of four volumes in personality science. He has published numerous scientific articles, primarily in the study of social-cognitive processes and personality. He has served as the Program Chairperson of the annual convention of the Association for Psychological Science on three occasions, and is the U.S.-based Chairperson of the inaugural International Convention of Psychological Science.


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Natalie Ciarocco

Natalie J. Ciarocco is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Monmouth University. She earned her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from Case Western Reserve University. Her main research focus is on the limited capacity of self-control and the role it plays in interpersonal relationships. She is also a scholar of teaching and learning. She is the recipient of grants from both the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (STP) to develop teaching resources for methodology courses. She has been published in Teaching of Psychology and has a book chapter on how to make psychology more self-relevant to students. Her current work in this area involves undergraduate professional development. Natalie is the co-creator and editor of an online collection of peer-reviewed resources for the teaching of research and statistics, as well as the co-founder and organizer of the Atlantic Coast Teaching of Psychology biennial conference. In 2006 she was awarded the Excellence and Innovation in Undergraduate Teaching Award from the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science at Florida Atlantic University. Natalie enjoys baking, traveling, and spending time at home with her husband, Dave, and daughter, Amelia.


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Sheila R. Cole

Sheila Cole is a former journalist who specialized in writing about families, children, development, and education. She is also a children's writer. Her most recent book offers a history of American childhood and is written for young people. She has also authored picture books, historical fiction, and novels for young adults. She participates in literacy programs for homeless adolescents.


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Michael Cole

Michael Cole is an all-University of California Professor of Psychology, Communication, and Human Development. His home base is University of California, San Diego, where he is the Director of the Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition. For many years he spent his afternoons participating with children and undergraduates in development-enhancing after-school programs. He is an editor of the journal Mind, Culture and Activity. He has published widely on the role of culture and schooling in development, for which he has been awarded honorary degrees at Copenhagen University and the University of Helsinki. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academies of Education (of the United States and Russia).  Dr. Cole is the 2011 recipient of the Distinguished Contributions to Cultural and Contextual Factors in Child Development Award.


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Joseph E. Comaty

Joseph E. Comaty received his M.S. in experimental psychology from Villanova University; his Ph.D. in psychology with a specialization in clinical neuropsychology from the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, in Illinois; and his postdoctoral Masters Degree in clinical psychopharmacology from Alliant University/CSPP in California. He is a licensed psychologist under the Louisiana State Board of Examiners of Psychologists (LSBEP) and a licensed medical psychologist under the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners. He retired from the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, Office of Behavioral Health in 2013 where he was the Chief Psychologist and Medical Psychologist and Director of the Division of Quality Management. He is an adjunct assistant professor in
psychology at Louisiana State University (LSU) in Baton Rouge and serves as emeritus faculty of the Southern Louisiana Internship Consortium (SLIC) in psychology at LSU. He has served as a member and chair of the LSBEP; he is a member and current chair of the RxP Designation Committee of APA, and a site reviewer for APA’s Committee on Accreditation. He is a member of the Model Act and Regulation Revision Committee for the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB). His research is in the areas of behavior therapy, pharmacology, and clinical psychopharmacology. He is the author of over 50 articles, book chapters, and presentations. He has served on federal grant review committees
and has been a reviewer for Psychiatric Services; The Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences; and the Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research.


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Ronald J. Comer

Ronald Comer has been a professor in Princeton University’s Department of Psychology for the past 27 years and has served as Director of Clinical Psychology Studies for most of that time. He is also currently the director of the department’s undergraduate program. 

Professor Comer has received the President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at the university. His course "Abnormal Psychology" is one of the university’s most popular, and he has offered it almost every year since his arrival at Princeton.  He is also a practicing clinical psychologist and serves as a consultant to the Eden Institute for Persons with Autism and to hospitals and family practice residency programs throughout New Jersey. Additionally, he holds an adjunct position as Clinical Associate Professor of Family Medicine at the UMDNJ–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.  In addition to his abnormal psychology textbooks with Worth Publishers, Professor Comer has also published a number of journal articles in clinical psychology, social psychology, and family medicine. 
 
Professor Comer was an undergraduate at the University of Pennsylvania and a graduate student at Clark University. He currently lives in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, with his wife, Marlene, and their dog, Annie. From there, he can keep an eye on his sons—Greg, a resident of New York, and Jon, currently a Philadelphian—and on the resurgent Philadelphia sports teams with whom he grew up.


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Ronald J. Comer

Ronald Comer has been a professor in Princeton University’s Department of Psychology for the past 27 years and has served as Director of Clinical Psychology Studies for most of that time. He is also currently the director of the department’s undergraduate program. 

Professor Comer has received the President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at the university. His course "Abnormal Psychology" is one of the university’s most popular, and he has offered it almost every year since his arrival at Princeton. He is also a practicing clinical psychologist and serves as a consultant to the Eden Institute for Persons with Autism and to hospitals and family practice residency programs throughout New Jersey. Additionally, he holds an adjunct position as Clinical Associate Professor of Family Medicine at the UMDNJ–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. In addition to his abnormal psychology textbooks with Worth Publishers, Professor Comer has also published a number of journal articles in clinical psychology, social psychology, and family medicine. 

Professor Comer was an undergraduate at the University of Pennsylvania and a graduate student at Clark University. He currently lives in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, with his wife, Marlene, and their dog, Annie. From there, he can keep an eye on his sons—Greg, a resident of New York, and Jon, currently a Floridian—and on the resurgent Philadelphia sports teams with whom he grew up.


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Eric W. Corty

Eric Corty has a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Vassar College, a doctorate in clinical psychology from Indiana University, and two postdoctoral fellowships, one in neuropsychopharmacology (University of Pennsylvania) and one in human sexuality (Case Western Reserve University).
 
Since 1993, Corty has been a member of the psychology faculty at Penn State Erie, the Behrend College. There he teaches principles of measurement, abnormal psychology, human sexuality, introductory psychology, and, of course, statistics.
The quality of his teaching was recognized in 1997 when he received the Council of Fellows Excellence in Teaching Award and in 2001 when he became a Penn State Teaching Fellow.
Corty has more than three dozen peer-reviewed publications. His research on
ejaculatory latencies received worldwide attention, including being made fun of on
the David Letterman show. His statistics textbook was recognized as a Book of the Year by the American Journal of Nursing in 1997. Corty serves as a member of the editorial board for The Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy and previously was on the editorial board for The Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.
Corty was born in Wilmington, Delaware, and still celebrates Delaware Day every
December 7th. He now lives in Beachwood, Ohio, with his wife, two sons, and two
cats. He likes to eat and to cook, loves to ride his bicycles, and is working on improving his pool game.


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Mark Costanzo

Mark Costanzo received his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of California at Santa Cruz. He is a professor of psychology at Claremont McKenna College and a member of the plenary faculty at Claremont Graduate University. He has published research on a variety of law-related topics including police interrogations, false confessions, jury decision-making, sexual harassment, attorney argumentation, alternative dispute resolution, and the death penalty. He has also published research in the areas of nonverbal communication, teaching techniques, and energy conservation. Professor Costanzo is author of the books, Just Revenge: Costs and Consequences of the Death Penalty and Psychology Applied to Law. He has co-edited four books, including, Expert Psychological Testimony for the Courts and Violence and the Law.
Professor Costanzo has served as a consultant or expert witness for more than 80 criminal cases. In 2008, he was the winner of the Outstanding Teaching and Mentoring Award from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI), and in 2010, he received the Outstanding Teaching and Mentoring Award from the American Psychology-Law Society (APLS).


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John C. DeFries

John C. DeFries is professor of psychology and faculty fellow of the Institute for Behavioral Genetics, University of Colorado, Boulder. After receiving his doctorate in agriculture (with specialty training in quantitative genetics) from the University of Illinois in 1961, he remained on the faculty of the University of Illinois for six years. In 1962, he began research on mouse behavioral genetics, and the following year he was a research fellow in genetics at the University of California, Berkeley. After returning to Illinois in 1964, DeFries initiated an extensive genetic analysis of open-field behavior in laboratory mice. Three years later, he joined the Institute for Behavioral Genetics, and he served as its director from 1981 to 2001. DeFries and Steve G. Vandenberg founded the journal Behavior Genetics in 1970, and DeFries and Robert Plomin founded the Colorado Adoption Project in 1975. For over three decades, DeFries’s major research interest has concerned the genetics of reading disabilities, founding the Colorado Learning Disabilities Research Center with Richard K. Olson in 1990. He served as president of the Behavior Genetics Association in 1982 and 1983, receiving the association’s Th. Dobzhansky Award for Outstanding Research in 1992; and he became a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (Section J, Psychology) in 1994 and the Association for Psychological Science in 2009.


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Judy S. DeLoache

Judy DeLoache is the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Psychology at the University of Virginia.  She has published extensively on aspects of cognitive development in infants and young children.  Dr. DeLoache has served as president of the Developmental Division of the American Psychological Association and as a member of the executive board of the International Society for the Study of Infancy.  She is currently the president-elect of the Cognitive Development Society.  She has presented major invited addresses at professional meetings, including the Association for Psychological Science and the Society for Research on Child Development.  Dr. DeLoache is the holder of a Scientific MERIT Award from the National Institutes of Health, and her research is also funded by the National Science Foundation.  She has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and the Rockefeller Foundation Study Center in Bellagio, Italy.  She was recently inducted into the National Academy of Arts and Sciences.


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Jack DeWaard

Jack DeWaard is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Graduate Faculty in Population Studies in the Minnesota Population Center at University of Minnesota who specializes in international and internal migration, racial and ethnic stratification and inequality, demography and ecology, and quantitative methods. DeWaard teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on research methods.


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C. Nathan DeWall

C. Nathan DeWall is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Social Psychology Lab at the University of Kentucky. He received his Bachelor’s Degree from St. Olaf College, a Master’s Degree in Social Science from the University of Chicago, and a Master’s degree and Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Florida State University. DeWall received the 2011 College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Teaching Award, which recognizes excellence in undergraduate and graduate teaching. In 2011, the Association for Psychological Science identified DeWall as a “Rising Star” for “making significant contributions to the field of psychological science.”
 
DeWall conducts research on close relationships, self-control, and aggression. With funding from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation, he has published over 120 scientific articles and chapters. DeWall’s research awards include the SAGE Young Scholars award from the Foundation for Personality and Social Psychology, the Young Investigator Award from the International Society for Research on Aggression, and the Early Career Award from the International Society for Self and Identity. His research has been covered by numerous media outlets, including Good Morning America, Newsweek, Atlantic Monthly, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Harvard Business Review, and National Public Radio. DeWall blogs for Psychology Today. He has lectured nationally and internationally, including in Hong Kong, China, the Netherlands, England, Greece, Hungary, and Australia.
 
Nathan is happily married to Alice DeWall. He enjoys playing with his two golden retrievers, Finnegan and Atticus. In his spare time, he writes novels, watches sports, and runs and runs and runs—including in 2013 a half marathon, two marathons, two 50-mile ultramarathons, and one 100-mile ultramarathon.
 


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Displaying 16-30 of 104