Displaying 31-45 of 95

Daniel T. Gilbert

Daniel Gilbert is Harvard College Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. After attending the Community College of Denver and completing his BA from the University of Colorado, Denver, he went on to earn his PhD from Princeton University. From 1985-1996, he taught on the faculty of the University of Texas, Austin, during which time he received the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Scientific Award for an Early Career Contribution to Psychology. In 1996, he joined the faculty of Harvard University. Gilbert has won numerous awards including the Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Prize and a Guggenheim Fellowship. His research on affective forecasting is an attempt to understand how and how well people predict their emotional reactions to future events. He is the author of the national bestseller Stumbling on Happiness.


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Mark A. Gluck

Mark A. Gluck is a Professor of Neuroscience at Rutgers University–Newark, co-director of the Memory Disorders Project at Rutgers–Newark, and publisher of the project’s public health newsletter, Memory Loss and the Brain.  His research focuses on the neural bases of learning and memory, and the consequences of memory loss due to aging, trauma, and disease.  He is co-author of Gateway to Memory: An Introduction to Neural Network Modeling of the Hippocampus and Learning (MIT Press, 2001).  In 1996, he was awarded an NSF Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers by President Bill Clinton. That same year, he received the American Psychological Association (APA) Distinguish Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology.


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Ethan E. Gorenstein

Ethan E. Gorenstein is clinical director of the Behavioral Medicine Program at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center and a professor of clinical psychology in the department of psychiatry at Columbia University. He is also the author of The Science of Mental Illness (Academic Press). He has an active clinical practice devoted to the use of evidence-based psychological treatment methods for problems of both children and adults.


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Susan Graham

Susan Graham is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Calgary and holds the Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Language and Cognitive Development. She is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Cognition and Development. After completing her undergraduate degree at the University of Manitoba, she moved to Concordia University to complete her graduate studies. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 1996. Her dissertation research was recognized with the International Society for Infant Studies Student Research Award.  Her research focuses on language and cognitive development during the infancy and preschool years and has been funded by NSERC, SSHRC, and the Canada Research Chairs Program.


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Peter O. Gray

Peter Gray was a full-time professor of psychology at Boston College for 30 years, where he served his department at various times as Department Chair, Undergraduate Program Director, and Graduate Program Director.  He has published research in biological, evolutionary, cultural, developmental and educational psychology; published articles on innovative teaching methods; taught more than 20 different undergraduate courses, including, most regularly, introductory psychology; helped develop a university-wide program to improve students' study and learning skills; and developed a program of research practicum courses. He is now retired from regular teaching, but maintains a position as Research Professor at Boston College.  Most of his current research and writing has to do with the value of play, especially free age-mixed play, in children's development.  He is author of a popular weekly blog entitled Freedom to Learn: The Roles of Play and Curiosity as Foundations for Learning.

Before joining Boston College, Peter Gray studied psychology as an undergraduate at Columbia University and earned a Ph.D. in biological sciences at Rockefeller University.  He earned his way through college by coaching basketball and working with youth groups in New York City.  As a graduate student he directed a summer biology program for talented high school students from impoverished neighborhoods.  His avocations today include long distance bicycling, kayaking, and backwoods skiing.


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Richard A. Griggs

Richard A. Griggs is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Florida. After earning his Ph.D. in cognitive psychology at Indiana University, he went to the University of Florida, where he has spent his entire academic career. He has won numerous teaching awards at the University of Florida and was named APA's Society for the Teaching of Psychology Teacher of the Year for 4-year Colleges and Universities in 1994. He served on the Editorial Board of Teaching of Psychology for over a decade, as a Contemporary Psychology Consulting Editor for textbook reviews, and as an Associate Editor of Thinking and Reasoning. His two main research areas are human reasoning and the teaching of psychology. He has published over 100 journal articles, reviews, and book chapters, including 31 in Teaching of Psychology. He was also one of the originators and developers of the Society for the Teaching of Psychology's online resource, A Compendium of Introductory Psychology Textbooks, and the editor of Volume 3 of the Society's Handbook for Teaching Introductory Psychology. When he isn't busy with professional activities, he likes to relax at home with wife Sherri, also a psychologist. His main pasttimes are golf, reading and fitness.


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Diana Hacker

Diana Hacker personally class-tested her handbooks with nearly four thousand students over thirty-five years at Prince George’s Community College in Maryland, where she was a member of the English faculty. Hacker handbooks, built on innovation and on a keen understanding of the challenges facing student writers, are the most widely adopted in America. Hacker handbooks, all published by Bedford/St. Martin’s, include The Bedford Handbook, Eighth Edition (2010); A Writer’s Reference, Seventh Edition (2011); Rules for Writers, Sixth Edition (2008); and A Pocket Style Manual, Fifth Edition (2008).


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Thomas Heinzen

Tom Heinzen was a 29 year-old college freshman, began graduate school when their fourth daughter was one week old, and is still amazed that he and Donna somehow managed to stay married. A magna cum laude graduate of Rockford College, he earned his Ph.D. in social psychology at the State University of New York at Albany in just three years. He published his first book on frustration and creativity in government two years later, was a research associate in public policy until he was fired over the shape of a graph, consulted for the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth, and then began a teaching career at William Paterson State University of New Jersey. He founded the psychology club, established an undergraduate research conference, and has been awarded various teaching honors while continuing to write journal articles, books, plays, and two novels that support the teaching of general psychology and statistics.  He is also the editor of Many Things to Tell You, a volume of poetry by elderly writers.  Tom's wife Donna is a physician assistant who has also volunteered her time in relief work following Hurricane Mitch and Hurricane Katrina. Their daughters are now scattered from Bangladesh to Mississippi to New Jersey and work in public health, teaching, and medicine. He is a mediocre French horn player, an enthusiastic but mediocre tennis player, and an ardent baseball fan (Go Cubs!).


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Don H. Hockenbury

Don H. Hockenbury is Associate Professor of Psychology at Tulsa Community College, where he has had the privilege of teaching undergraduates for more than 30 years. Although he enjoys the unique challenges of teaching online, the classroom remains Don’s favorite forum for teaching students about the science and personal relevance of psychology. He is a recipient of the Tulsa Community College Award for Teaching Excellence. Don’s educational background includes a B.S. in psychology and an M.A. in clinical psychology, both from the University of Tulsa. Before he began his teaching career, he worked in psychiatric facilities and in private practice.

Don’s favorite research interests include the scientific study of sleep and dreaming, biopsychology, memory, psychological disorders, and the history of psychology. Don belongs to several professional organizations, including the Association of Psychological Science (APS), the American Psychological Association (APA), the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), and the Sleep Research Society (SRS).


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Sandra E. Hockenbury

Sandra E. Hockenbury is a science writer who specializes in psychology. Sandy received her B.A. from Shimer College and her M.A. from the University of Chicago, where she was also a research associate at the Institute of Social and Behavioral Pathology. Prior to co-authoring Psychology and Discovering Psychology, Sandy worked for several years as a psychology editor in both academic and college textbook publishing. Sandy has also taught as an adjunct faculty member at Tulsa Community College.

Sandy’s areas of interest include positive psychology, cross-cultural psychology, and the intersection of Buddhist philosophy, neuroscience, and psychology. She is a member of the American Psychological Association (APA), the Association of Psychological Science (APS), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Sandy is a member of the Board of Trustees of Shimer College and recently served as a volunteer with Nomads Clinic, a nonprofit organization that brings medical care to remote areas in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and the Tibetan Plateau.
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Don and Sandy’s daughter, Laura, is a college senior and geology major who, like her parents, has wide-ranging interests, including climate change, sustainable development, psychology, and the arts. A classical and improvisational pianist, co-director of her college comedy sketch group, and enthusiastic member of the 2011 Division III Ultimate college women’s championship team, Laura has recently taken up the mandolin.


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Misty Hull

Misty Hull is a Professor of Psychology and co-chair of the Department of Psychology at Pikes Peak Community College in Colorado Springs, Colorado.  She has taught a range of psychology courses at Pikes Peak Community College, including introductory psychology, human sexuality, and social psychology in a variety of delivery formats (traditional, online, and hybrid).  Her love of teaching comes through in her dedication to mentoring new and part-time faculty in the teaching of psychology. She received her Bachelor of Science from Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas, and her Master’s in Professional Counseling at Colorado Christian University in Lakewood, Colorado. She has served in a variety of administrative roles at Pikes Peak Community College, including interim Associate Dean, and Coordinator of the Student Crisis Counseling Office.  In addition, she has helped to develop the state system’s approach to teaching psychology, as the state psychology discipline chair of the Colorado Community College System from 2002-2010. One of her many professional interests includes research on the impact of student persistence in higher education.


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Displaying 31-45 of 95