Displaying 31-45 of 96

Chava Frankfort-Nachmias

Chava Frankfort-Nachmias is an Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. In addition to Research Methods in the Social Sciences, she is coauthor of Social Statistics for a Diverse Society, coeditor of Sappho in the Holy Land (with Erella Shadmi) and numerous publications on ethnicity and development, urban revitalization, science and gender, and women in Israel. She was the recipient of the University of Wisconsin System teaching improvement grant on integrating race, ethnicity, and gender into the social statistics and research methods curriculum.


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Daniel T. Gilbert

Daniel Gilbert is Edgar Pierce Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. After attending the Community College of Denver and completing his B.A. from the University of Colorado, Denver, he went on to earn his Ph.D. from Princeton University. From 1985 to 1996, he taught at the University of Texas, Austin, and in 1996, he joined the faculty of Harvard University. He has received the American Psychological Association's Distinguished Scientific Award for an Early Career Contribution to Psychology, the Diener Award for Outstanding Contributions to Social Psychology, and has won teaching awards that include the Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Prize and the Harvard College Professorship. His research focuses on how and how well people think about their emotional reactions to future events. He is the author of the international best seller Stumbling on Happiness, which won the Royal Society's General Prize for best popular science book of the year, and he is the co-writer and host of the PBS television series, This Emotional Life.


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Mark A. Gluck

Mark A. Gluck is a Professor of Neuroscience at Rutgers University–Newark, co-director of the Memory Disorders Project at Rutgers–Newark, and publisher of the project’s public health newsletter, Memory Loss and the Brain.  His research focuses on the neural bases of learning and memory, and the consequences of memory loss due to aging, trauma, and disease.  He is co-author of Gateway to Memory: An Introduction to Neural Network Modeling of the Hippocampus and Learning (MIT Press, 2001).  In 1996, he was awarded an NSF Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers by President Bill Clinton. That same year, he received the American Psychological Association (APA) Distinguish Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology.


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Ethan E. Gorenstein

Ethan E. Gorenstein is clinical director of the Behavioral Medicine Program at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center and a professor of clinical psychology in the department of psychiatry at Columbia University. He is also the author of The Science of Mental Illness (Academic Press). He has an active clinical practice devoted to the use of evidence-based psychological treatment methods for problems of both children and adults.


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Susan Graham

Susan Graham is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Calgary and holds the Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Language and Cognitive Development. She is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Cognition and Development. After completing her undergraduate degree at the University of Manitoba, she moved to Concordia University to complete her graduate studies. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 1996. Her dissertation research was recognized with the International Society for Infant Studies Student Research Award.  Her research focuses on language and cognitive development during the infancy and preschool years and has been funded by NSERC, SSHRC, and the Canada Research Chairs Program.


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Peter O. Gray

Peter Gray was a full-time professor of psychology at Boston College for 30 years, where he served his department at various times as Department Chair, Undergraduate Program Director, and Graduate Program Director.  He has published research in biological, evolutionary, cultural, developmental and educational psychology; published articles on innovative teaching methods; taught more than 20 different undergraduate courses, including, most regularly, introductory psychology; helped develop a university-wide program to improve students' study and learning skills; and developed a program of research practicum courses. He is now retired from regular teaching, but maintains a position as Research Professor at Boston College.  Most of his current research and writing has to do with the value of play, especially free age-mixed play, in children's development.  He is author of a popular weekly blog entitled Freedom to Learn: The Roles of Play and Curiosity as Foundations for Learning.

Before joining Boston College, Peter Gray studied psychology as an undergraduate at Columbia University and earned a Ph.D. in biological sciences at Rockefeller University.  He earned his way through college by coaching basketball and working with youth groups in New York City.  As a graduate student he directed a summer biology program for talented high school students from impoverished neighborhoods.  His avocations today include long distance bicycling, kayaking, and backwoods skiing.


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Jeff Greenberg

Jeff Greenberg is a Professor of Psychology and College of Science Fellow at the University of Arizona. As a small child growing up in the Bronx, he was very curious about the human propensities for vanity and prejudice. Jeff majored in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, but it wasn’t until his final semester, and his first course in social psychology, that he found a field where people where asking the questions he thought should be asked. Soon after starting a master’s program in social psychology at Southern Methodist University, he knew this was what he wanted to spend his life studying and teaching. After receiving his M.A., Jeff completed his Ph.D. at University of Kansas in 1982 under the mentorship of Jack Brehm. He has since received numerous research and teaching awards. His research has contributed to understanding self-serving biases, how motivation affects cognition, the effects of ethnic slurs, the role of self-awareness in depression, cognitive dissonance, and how concerns about death contribute to prejudice, self-esteem striving, and many other aspects of social behavior. Jeff has also co-authored or co-edited six prior books, including the Handbook of Experimental Existential Psychology and In the Wake of 9/11: The Psychology of Terror.


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Richard A. Griggs

Richard A. Griggs is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Florida. After earning his Ph.D. in cognitive psychology at Indiana University, he went to the University of Florida, where he has spent his entire academic career. He has won numerous teaching awards at the University of Florida and was named APA's Society for the Teaching of Psychology Teacher of the Year for 4-year Colleges and Universities in 1994. He served on the Editorial Board of Teaching of Psychology for over a decade, as a Contemporary Psychology Consulting Editor for textbook reviews, and as an Associate Editor of Thinking and Reasoning. His two main research areas are human reasoning and the teaching of psychology. He has published over 100 journal articles, reviews, and book chapters, including 31 in Teaching of Psychology. He was also one of the originators and developers of the Society for the Teaching of Psychology's online resource, A Compendium of Introductory Psychology Textbooks, and the editor of Volume 3 of the Society's Handbook for Teaching Introductory Psychology. When he isn't busy with professional activities, he likes to relax at home with wife Sherri, also a psychologist. His main pasttimes are golf, reading and fitness.


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Diana Hacker

Diana Hacker personally class-tested her handbooks with nearly four thousand students over thirty-five years at Prince George’s Community College in Maryland, where she was a member of the English faculty. Hacker handbooks, built on innovation and on a keen understanding of the challenges facing student writers, are the most widely adopted in America. Hacker handbooks, all published by Bedford/St. Martin’s, include The Bedford Handbook, Ninth Edition (2014); A Writer’s Reference, Eighth Edition (2015); Rules for Writers, Seventh Edition (2012); and A Pocket Style Manual, Seventh Edition (2015).


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Thomas Heinzen

Tom Heinzen is Professor of Psychology at William Paterson University of New Jersey. A graduate of Rockford College, he earned his Ph.D. in social psychology at the State University of New York at Albany. After publishing his first book on frustration  and creativity in government, Heinzen worked as a public policy research associate, consulted for the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth, and then began his teaching career. He founded William Paterson University’s Psychology Club, established an undergraduate research conference, and has been awarded various teaching honors while continuing to write articles, books, and plays that support the teaching of general psychology and statistics. Heinzen, a fellow of the Eastern Psychological Association, is also the editor of Many Things to Tell You, a volume of poetry by elderly writers. His current  research involves applying game design to higher education.


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Don H. Hockenbury

Don H. Hockenbury is Associate Professor of Psychology at Tulsa Community College, where he has had the privilege of teaching undergraduates for more than 30 years. Although he enjoys the unique challenges of teaching online, the classroom remains Don’s favorite forum for teaching students about the science and personal relevance of psychology. He is a recipient of the Tulsa Community College Award for Teaching Excellence. Don’s educational background includes a B.S. in psychology and an M.A. in clinical psychology, both from the University of Tulsa. Before he began his teaching career, he worked in psychiatric facilities and in private practice.

Don’s favorite research interests include the scientific study of sleep and dreaming, biopsychology, memory, psychological disorders, and the history of psychology. Don belongs to several professional organizations, including the Association of Psychological Science (APS), the American Psychological Association (APA), the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), and the Sleep Research Society (SRS).


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Displaying 31-45 of 96