Displaying 61-75 of 96

Deborah Licht

Deborah Licht is a professor of psychology at Pikes Peak Community College in Colorado Springs, Colorado. She has over two decades of teaching and research experience in a variety of settings, ranging from a small private university in the midwest to a large public university in Copenhagen, Denmark. She has taught introductory psychology, psychology of the workplace, abnormal psychology, the history of psychology, child development, and elementary statistics. She has experience in traditional, online, and hybrid courses, and is particularly inspired by first-generation college students who turn to community colleges to pursue their education. She received a BS in psychology from Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio; an MS in clinical psychology from the University of Dayton; and a PhD in psychology (experimental psychopathology) from Harvard University. She continues to be interested in research on causal beliefs and their influence on behavior, particularly in relation to how college students think about their successes and failures as they pursue their degrees.


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Cynthia Lightfoot

Cynthia Lightfoot is Professor and Head of Human Development and Family Studies at the Pennsylvania State University, Brandywine. Her published works focus on the sociocultural contexts of child and adolescent development, most recently, on teen pregnancy.


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Scott Lilienfeld

Scott O. Lilienfeld is Professor of Psychology at Emory University in Georgia. He received his bachelor’s degree from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in psychology (clinical) from the University of Minnesota. Lilienfeld is Associate Editor of the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, President of the Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy, and past President of the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology. He has published over 300 articles, chapters, and books on personality and dissociative disorders, psychiatric classification, pseudoscience in psychology, and evidence-based practices in clinical psychology. A Fellow of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry and a columnist for Scientific American Mind, Lilienfeld was a recipient of the David Shakow Award for Outstanding Early Career Contributions to Clinical Psychology and the James McKeen Cattell Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Applied Psychological Science.


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Thomas Ludwig

Tom Ludwig is interested in research on hemisphere differences in the brain, advocacy for older adults, and integrating technology into teaching. In the 1980s and 1990s, Tom Ludwig studied how the two hemispheres process and share information about letters, words, and simple spatial patterns. This past year Tom and his students conducted four experiments on hemisphere differences in recognizing and producing facial expressions of emotion. Tom also continues to make presentations to churches and community groups on various aspects of aging, including age discrimination, memory and aging, and searching for meaning in the aging process.

In 1984, Tom began work on PsychSim, a set of instructional activities for introductory psychology. In 2005, PsychSim 5 was released, boosting the number of activities from 19 to 42, and making much heavier use of animations and video clips. Tom has also produced PsychQuest (a set of in-depth activities related to the psychology of college life), PsychOnline (a complete set of materials for distance education), PsychInquiry (a set of activities focused on critical thinking and research methodology), and has collaborated with four other professors to produce Exploring Human Development (a set of video-based observational activities for developmental psychology) and with a dozen professors to produce ActivePsych (a set of interactive demonstrations for classroom use). Tom's most recent project is Concepts in Action, a set of 109 instructional activities embedded within a comprehensive psychology resource called LaunchPad. The range of computer-based activities that Tom has developed over the past two decades was a key factory in the decision by the Americal Psychological Foundation to name him as the 2005 recipient of the Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award.


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Kaitlyn McLachlan

Kaitlyn McLachlan, University of Alberta Kaitlyn McLachlan is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Alberta, and a research fellow of NeuroDevNet. She has published in the area of clinical forensic psychology and does research with vulnerable populations in the criminal justice system. Dr.
McLachlan co-edited (with Ronald Roesch) an international collection of seminal publications in forensic clinical psychology.


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Eduardo Mercado

Eduardo Mercado is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at University at Buffalo, The State University of New York.  His research focuses on how different brain systems interact to develop representations of experienced events, and how these representations change over time.  Dr. Mercado currently uses techniques from experimental psychology, computational neuroscience, electrical engineering, and behavioral neuroscience to explore questions about auditory learning and memory in rodents, cetaceans, and humans.


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Patricia H. Miller

Dr. Miller (Ph.D., University of Minnesota) is professor of psychology at San Francisco State University. She has held faculty positions at the University of Michigan, the University of Florida, and the University of Georgia and also has served as Department Head, Associate Dean, and Director of Women’s Studies. Her research focuses on cognitive development during childhood. More specifically, she studies cognitive strategies, executive function, metacognition, memory, attention, social cognitive development, theory of mind, and gender. Her theoretical interests include theories of development and feminist theories of knowledge. One current topic of interest, the effects of exercise on children’s executive function and school achievement, is funded by NIH.


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David G. Myers

David Myers received his psychology Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. He has spent his career at Hope College, Michigan, where he has taught dozens of introductory psychology sections. Hope College students have invited him to be their commencement speaker and voted him "outstanding professor."

His research and writings have been recognized by the Gordon Allport Intergroup Relations Prize, by a 2010 Honored Scientist award from the Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences, by a 2010 Award for Service on Behalf of Personality and Social Psychology, by a 2013 Presidential Citation from APA Division 2, and by three dozen honorary doctorates.

With support from National Science Foundation grants, Myers' scientific articles have appeared in three dozen scientific periodicals, including Science, American Scientist, Psychological Science, and the American Psychologist. In addition to his scholarly writing and his textbooks for introductory and social psychology, he also digests psychological science for the general public. His writings have appeared in four dozen magazines, from Today's Education to Scientific American. He also has authored five general audience books, including The Pursuit of Happiness and Intuition: Its Powers and Perils.

David Myers has chaired his city's Human Relations Commission, helped found a thriving assistance center for families in poverty, and spoken to hundreds of college and community groups. Drawing on his experience, he also has written articles and a book (A Quiet World) about hearing loss, and he is advocating a transformation in American assistive listening technology (see www.hearingloop.org). For his leadership, he received an American Academy of Audiology Presidential Award in 2011, and the Hearing Loss Association of America Walter T. Ridder Award in 2012.

He bikes to work year-round and plays daily pick-up basketball. David and Carol Myers have raised two sons and a daughter, and have one granddaughter to whom he dedicates the Third Edition of Psychology in Everyday Life.


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Catherine E. Myers

Catherine E. Myers is a Research Scientist with the Department of Veterans Affairs, New Jersey Health Care System, and a Professor in the department of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Neuroscience at the New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University.  Her research includes both computational neuroscience and experimental psychology, and focuses on human learning and memory, especially in clinical disorders such as amnesia and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).  She is co-author of Gateway to Memory: An Introduction to Neural Network Modeling of the Hippocampus and Learning (MIT Press, 2001) and author of Delay Learning in Artificial Neural Networks (Chapman and Hall, 1992).


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David Nachmias

David Nachmias is a Senior Fellow Emeritus at the Israel Democracy Institute (IDI) and holds the Romulo Betancourt Chair in Political Science at Tel Aviv University. Professor Nachmias has extensively published and presented papers in the areas of Political Science, Public Administration and Public Policy, both in Israel and abroad. He now serves on the editorial board of Policy Studies Review; and is a member of the American Political Science Association; Midwest Political Science Association; Policy Studies Organization; the International Political Science Association and Israel's Political Science Association. His numerous books and articles include: Public Policy in Israel, Frank Cass, 2002; Executive Governance in Israel, Patgrave, 2002 "The Bias of Pluralism: The Redistributive Consequences of Israel's New Electoral Law" in A. Arian and Michal Shamir (eds.) The Elections in Israel - 1996, State University of New York Press, 1999.


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Jenae M. Neiderhiser

Jenae M. Neiderhiser is Liberal Arts Research Professor of Psychology at The Pennsylvania State University. After receiving her Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Studies from The Pennsylvania State University in 1994, she joined the faculty of the Center for Family Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C., advancing from Assistant Research Professor to Professor from 1994 to 2007. In 2007 she joined the Department of Psychology at The Pennsylvania State University and also holds the appointment of Professor of Human Development and affiliate scientist at the Oregon Social Learning Center. Neiderhiser’s work has focused on how genes and environments work together throughout the lifespan. She has had a particular focus on genotype-environment correlation and how individuals shape their own environments, especially within the family. In her pursuit of this question she has collaborated on developing a number of novel or underutilized research designs including the Extended Children of Twins and an ongoing prospective adoption study, the Early Growth and Development Study. Neiderhiser is an associate editor for the Journal of Research on Adolescence and Frontiers in Behavioral and Psychiatric Genetics and is on the editorial board of several developmental psychology journals.


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Matthew K. Nock

Matthew Nock is a Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. Matt received his B.A. from Boston University (1995) and his Ph.D. from Yale University (2003), and he completed his clinical internship at Bellevue Hospital and the New York University Child Study Center (2003). Matt joined the faculty of Harvard University in 2003 and has been there ever since. While an undergraduate, Matt became very interested in the question of why people do things to intentionally harm themselves, and he has been conducting research aimed at answering this question ever since. His research is multidisciplinary in nature and uses a range of methodological approaches (e.g., epidemiologic surveys, laboratory-based experiments, and clinic-based studies) to better understand how these behaviors develop, how to predict them, and how to prevent their occurrence. He has received multiple teaching awards at Harvard and also four early career awards recognizing his research, and in 2011, he was named a MacArthur Fellow.


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Susan A. Nolan

Susan A. Nolan is a Professor of Psychology at Seton Hall University in New Jersey. Susan researches interpersonal consequences of mental illness and the role of gender in STEM fields. Susan holds leadership roles in the Society for the Teaching of Psychology and is the President of the Eastern Psychological Association — while also being a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. She regularly gives talks about incorporating scientific literacy into the introductory course and across the psychology curriculum. Susan particularly enjoys her time in the classroom teaching Introductory Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, International Psychology and Statistics.


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Michael Passer

Michael W. Passer is Senior Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Washington. Born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, he entered the University of Rochester fully expecting to be a physics or chemistry major, but he became hooked on psychological science after taking introductory psychology and a seminar course on the nature of the mind. He got his start as an undergraduate researcher under the mentorship of Dr. Harold Sigall, was a volunteer undergraduate introductory psychology Teaching Assistant, and received a Danforth Foundation Fellowship that partly funded his graduate studies and exposed him to highly enriching national conferences on college teaching.
Dr. Passer received his Ph.D. from UCLA, where he conducted laboratory research on attribution theory under the primary mentorship of Dr. Harold Kelley and gained several years of field research experience studying competitive stress, self-esteem, and attributional processes among boys and girls playing youth sports, mainly working with Dr. Tara Scanlan in the Department of Kinesiology. At the University of Washington he has conducted hypothesistesting field research on competitive stress with youth sport participants, collaborated on several applied research projects in the fi eld of industrial-organizational psychology, and for the past 20 years has been a Senior Lecturer and faculty coordinator of U.W.’s introductory psychology courses. In this role, he annually teaches courses in introductory psychology and research methods, developed a graduate course on the teaching of psychology, and is a U.W. Distinguished Teaching Award nominee. With his colleague Ronald Smith, he has coauthored five editions of the introductory textbook Psychology: The Science of Mind and Behavior (McGraw-Hill), and has published more than 20 scientific articles and chapters, mostly on attribution theory and competitive stress.

 


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Thomas W. Pierce

Thomas Pierce is a professor in the Department of Psychology at Radford University. He has been teaching statistics and research methods since coming to Radford in 1992. He has a B.A. in Psychology from McGill University and a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Maine. He was also a postdoctoral fellow in the Center for the Study of Aging at Duke University Medical Center. His research interests are in the areas of aging and cognitive function, stress and human performance, and time series analysis of behavioral and physiological data.


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Displaying 61-75 of 96