Displaying 76-90 of 103

Matthew K. Nock

Matthew Nock is a Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. Matt received his B.A. from Boston University (1995) and his Ph.D. from Yale University (2003), and he completed his clinical internship at Bellevue Hospital and the New York University Child Study Center (2003). Matt joined the faculty of Harvard University in 2003 and has been there ever since. While an undergraduate, Matt became very interested in the question of why people do things to intentionally harm themselves, and he has been conducting research aimed at answering this question ever since. His research is multidisciplinary in nature and uses a range of methodological approaches (e.g., epidemiologic surveys, laboratory-based experiments, and clinic-based studies) to better understand how these behaviors develop, how to predict them, and how to prevent their occurrence. He has received multiple teaching awards at Harvard and also four early career awards recognizing his research, and in 2011, he was named a MacArthur Fellow.


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Susan A. Nolan

Susan A. Nolan is Professor of Psychology at Seton Hall University in New Jersey. A graduate of the College of the Holy Cross, she earned her Ph.D. in psychology from Northwestern University. Susan researches interpersonal consequences of mental illness and the role of gender in science and technology fields. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation. Susan served as a nongovernmental representative  from the American Psychological Association (APA) to the United Nations for five years, and is Vice President for Diversity and International Relations of the Society for the Teaching of Psychology. She is the 2014–2015 President of the Eastern Psychological Association (EPA), and is a Fellow of both EPA and APA.


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Walter E. Oliu

Walter E. Oliu served as chief of the Publishing Services Branch at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, where he managed the agency’s printing, graphics, editing, and publishing programs. He also developed the public-access standards for and managed daily operations of the agency’s public Web site.  He has taught at Miami University of Ohio, Slippery Rock State University, and as an adjunct faculty member at Montgomery College and George Mason University.  His books include Writing That Works,  Tenth Edition  (reprinted chapters appear in Kevin J. Harty’s Strategies for Business and Technical Writing, Fifth Edition, , and Brenda D. Smith and Laura C. Headley’s The Lifelong Reader, Second Edition); The Handbook of Technical Writing, Ninth Edition; The Business Writer’s Handbook, Ninth eEdition (Fortune and Book-of-the-Month Club selections); The Business Writer’s Companion, Sixth Edition; The Technical Writer’s Companion, Third Edition; Writing from A-Z, Fifth Edition; and The Professional Writer.


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Michael Passer

Michael W. Passer is Senior Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Washington. Born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, he entered the University of Rochester fully expecting to be a physics or chemistry major, but he became hooked on psychological science after taking introductory psychology and a seminar course on the nature of the mind. He got his start as an undergraduate researcher under the mentorship of Dr. Harold Sigall, was a volunteer undergraduate introductory psychology Teaching Assistant, and received a Danforth Foundation Fellowship that partly funded his graduate studies and exposed him to highly enriching national conferences on college teaching.
Dr. Passer received his Ph.D. from UCLA, where he conducted laboratory research on attribution theory under the primary mentorship of Dr. Harold Kelley and gained several years of field research experience studying competitive stress, self-esteem, and attributional processes among boys and girls playing youth sports, mainly working with Dr. Tara Scanlan in the Department of Kinesiology. At the University of Washington he has conducted hypothesistesting field research on competitive stress with youth sport participants, collaborated on several applied research projects in the fi eld of industrial-organizational psychology, and for the past 20 years has been a Senior Lecturer and faculty coordinator of U.W.’s introductory psychology courses. In this role, he annually teaches courses in introductory psychology and research methods, developed a graduate course on the teaching of psychology, and is a U.W. Distinguished Teaching Award nominee. With his colleague Ronald Smith, he has coauthored five editions of the introductory textbook Psychology: The Science of Mind and Behavior (McGraw-Hill), and has published more than 20 scientific articles and chapters, mostly on attribution theory and competitive stress.

 


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Thomas W. Pierce

Thomas Pierce is a professor in the Department of Psychology at Radford University. He has been teaching statistics and research methods since coming to Radford in 1992. He has a B.A. in Psychology from McGill University and a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Maine. He was also a postdoctoral fellow in the Center for the Study of Aging at Duke University Medical Center. His research interests are in the areas of aging and cognitive function, stress and human performance, and time series analysis of behavioral and physiological data.


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Robert Plomin

Robert Plomin is MRC Research Professor of Behavioral Genetics at the Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre at the Institute of Psychiatry in London. He received his doctorate in psychology from the University of Texas, Austin, in 1974, one of the few graduate programs in psychology that offered a specialty in behavioral genetics at that time. He then became an assistant professor at the Institute for Behavioral Genetics at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he began working with John DeFries. Together, they created the longitudinal Colorado Adoption Project of behavioral development, which has continued for more than 30 years. Plomin worked at Pennsylvania State University from 1986 until 1994, when he moved to the Institute of Psychiatry in London to help launch the Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre. The goal of his research is to bring together genetic and environmental research strategies to investigate behavioral development. Plomin is now conducting a study of all twins born in England during the period 1994 to 1996, focusing on developmental delays in childhood. He is a past president of the Behavior Genetics Association (1989-1990) and has received lifetime achievement awards from the Behavior Genetics Association (2002), American Psychological Society (2005), the Society for Research in Child Development (2005), and the International Society for Intelligence Research (2011).


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Russell Revlin

Russell Revlin is associate professor of psychology at the University of California–Santa Barbara. His academic journey began when, as a biopsychology student, he came across a tattered book on reasoning and problem solving at UCLA that expanded his view of psychology. The following year he was graduate student in cognitive psychology at Carnegie Mellon University, where he earned a PhD. After a postdoctoral fellowship in psycholinguistics from Stanford University, Dr. Revlin established his laboratory in human inference, focusing on how memory, language, and imaginal processes contribute to our ability to reason about novel situations and domains.


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Robin Rosenberg

Robin S. Rosenberg is a clinical psychologist in private practice and she has taught psychology courses at Lesley University and Harvard University. In addition, she is coauthor (along with Stephen Kosslyn) of Psychology in Context and Fundamentals of Psychology in Context. She is the editor of Psychology of Superheroes, and contributor to The Psychology of Harry Potter, and Batman Unauthorized. She is board certified in clinical psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology, and has been certified in clinical hypnosis. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Clinical Psychology and is a member of the Academy for Eating Disorders. She received her B.A. in psychology from New York University, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Rosenberg completed her clinical internship at Massachusetts Mental Health Center and had a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Community Health Plan before joining the staff at Newton-Wellesley Hospital’s Outpatient Services, where she worked before leaving to expand her private practice. Dr. Rosenberg specializes in treating people with depression, anxiety, and eating disorders, and is interested in the integration of different therapy approaches. She was the founder and coordinator of the New England Society for Psychotherapy Integration. Dr. Rosenberg enjoys using superhero stories to illustrate psychological principles, and can sometimes be found at comic conventions.


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Jenny Saffran

Jenny Saffran is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of
Wisconsin–Madison. Her research focuses on the learning abilities
required to master the complexities of language. Related research concerns infant music perception, and the relationship between music and language learning.


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Daniel L. Schacter

Daniel Schacter is William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. Dan received his B.A. degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He subsequently developed a keen interest in amnesic disorders associated with various kinds of brain damage. He continued his research and education at the University of Toronto, where he received his Ph.D. in 1981. He taught on the faculty at Toronto for the next six years before joining the psychology department at the University of Arizona in 1987. In 1991, he joined the faculty at Harvard University. His research explores the relation between conscious and unconscious forms of memory, the nature of distortions and errors in remembering, and how we use memory to imagine future events. Many of Schacter's studies are summarized in his 1996 book, Searching for Memory: The Brain, The Mind, and The Past, and his 2001 book, The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers, both winners of the APA's William James Book Award. Schacter has also received a number of awards for teaching and research, including the Harvard-Radcliffe Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Prize, the Warren Medal from the Society of Experimental Psychologists, and the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions from the American Psychological Association. In 2013, he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.


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Toni Schmader

Toni Schmader is a Canada Research Chair in Social Psychology at the University of British Columbia. She received her B.A. from Washington & Jefferson College in Pennsylvania before completing her Ph.D. at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Before moving to Canada in 2009, she taught at the University of Arizona for 10 years. At UBC, she was awarded the Killam Prize for excellence in research, and at the U of A she received the Magellan Prize for excellence in teaching. She is currently a member of the executive committee of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology and an Associate Editor at the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. She was drawn to research in social psychology for its ability to take a systematic empirical approach to examining important social issues and to teaching for the opportunity to share those insights with others. Her research examines how individuals are affected by and cope with tarnished identities and negative stereotypes. She has published work on topics of social identity threat, stigma and identity, stereotyping and prejudice, self-conscious emotion, and gender roles.


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Displaying 76-90 of 103