Displaying 1-15 of 16

Charles W. Calhoun

Charles W. Calhoun is a professor of history at East Carolina University. A former National Endowment for the Humanities fellow, Calhoun is the author or editor of four books, including The Gilded Age, and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. He lives in Greenville, North Carolina.


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Philip Caputo

Philip Caputo is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author of many works of fiction and nonfiction, including A Rumor of War, one of the most highly praised books of the twentieth century. His novels include Acts of Faith, The Voyage, Horn of Africa, and Crossers. He and his wife, Leslie Ware, divide their time between Norwalk, Connecticut, and Patagonia, Arizona.


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Eric Carle

Eric Carle is one of America's leading children's book illustrators. Born in the United States, he spent some time in Germany where he studied at the Academy of Applied Art in Stuttgart. His work has won many awards and has been published in more than a dozen countries around the world. He is author and illustrator of The Very Hungry Caterpillar and illustrator of Bill Martin, Jr.'s Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?


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Alejo Carpentier

Alejo Carpentier was born in Havana in 1904. He lived for many years in France and Venezuela but returned to Cuba after the revolution. One of the major Latin American writers of this century, he is the author of The Lost Steps, Explosion in a Cathedral, and The Chase. He died in Paris in 1980.


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Michael Chabon

Michael Chabon is the bestselling author of The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, Werewolves in Their Youth, The Yiddish Policemen’s Union, Wonder Boys, and The Mysteries of Pittsburgh. Kavalier & Clay won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize. In 2000 Wonder Boys was adapted into a critically acclaimed film starring Michael Douglas. Chabon was born in Washington, D.C., and grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Columbia, Maryland.  He now lives in California with his wife and children.


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John Henrik Clarke

John Henrik Clarke was born in 1915 in Union Springs, Alabama, and was brought up in Columbus, Georgia. Editor, lecturer, writer, and teacher, Dr. Clarke lived in New York City from 1933 until his death in 1998.


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Bryan Collier

Bryan Collier is the author and illustrator of Uptown, winner of the Coretta Scott King Award and the Ezra Jack Keats Book Award. He is also the illustrator of Martin’s Big Words, which was a Caldecott Honor Book. The Chicago Sun-Times has called Collier’s art “breathtakingly beautiful.” Mr. Collier lives with his family in Harlem in New York City.


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Roger Collins

Roger Collins is at the Department of History, University of Edinburgh.


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Ernie Colón

Ernie Colón is the illustrator of the New York Times bestseller The 9/11 Report: A Graphic Adaptation, After 9/11, Che, and Anne Frank (all published by Hill and Wang). He has worked at Marvel, where he oversaw the production of Spider-Man, and at DC Comics, where he did the same for Green Lantern, Wonder Woman, Blackhawk, and the Flash.


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Edward Countryman

Edward Countryman is University Distinguished Professor in the Clements Department of History at Southern Methodist University. He has also taught at the Universities of Warwick and Cambridge, the University of Canterbury, and Yale University. He has published widely on the American Revolution, winning a Bancroft Prize for his book A People in Revolution (1981). Together with Evonne von Heussen-Countryman, he has also published Shane in the British Film Institute Film Classics series.  As of late 2010 he is working on two book projects.  One is a short volume on African Americans and the era of American independence.  The other is a longer study of how Native Americans became familiar with the world and the ideas of invading Europeans during the colonial era.


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William Cronon

William Cronon is the Frederick Jackson Turner Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His book Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West won the Bancroft Prize in 1992.


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Displaying 1-15 of 16