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Sonia Maasik

The coeditors are successful textbook authors who, between them, have over fifty years of teaching experience in the college classroom. Sonia Maasik, a lecturer in the UCLA Writing Programs, has taught writing from developmental to advanced levels, and coordinates training for UCLA writing programs' teaching assistants. Jack Solomon, a professor of English at California State University, Northridge, teaches literature and critical theory, along with his graduate and undergraduate classes on popular cultural semiotics, and is often interviewed by the media for analysis of current events and trends. He is the author of The Signs of Our Time (1988) and Discourse and Reference in the Nuclear Age (1988).  The two together have published Signs of Life in the U.S.A.: Readings on Popular Culture for Writers, Sixth Edition (Bedford/St. Martin's, 2009) and California Dreams and Realities, Third Edition (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2005).


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Nancy MacLean

Nancy MacLean (PhD, University of Wisconsin, 1989) is Trinity College of Arts and Sciences Professor of History at Duke University. A scholar of twentieth-century U.S. history, she studies in particular the workings of class, gender, race, and region in social movements and public policy. Her first book, Behind the Mask of Chivalry: The Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan (1994), was named a noteworthy book of the year by the New York Times Book Review, and received the Rawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians, the Owsley Prize from the Southern Historical Association, and the Rosenhaupt Award from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. Her most recent book, Freedom Is Not Enough: The Opening of the American Workplace (2006), received an Outstanding Book Award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights, the Willard Hurst Prize for best book in sociolegal history from the Law and Society Association, the Labor History Best Book Prize from the International Association of Labor History Institutions, the Richard A. Lester Prize for the Outstanding Book in Labor Economics and Industrial Relations, and the Lillian Smith Book Award from the Southern Regional Council. She is currently working on a book about the origins of the push to privatize public services and decision-making.


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Peter C. Mancall

Peter C. Mancall is Professor of History and Anthropology at the University of Southern California and the Director of the USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute.  He is the author of five books, including Deadly Medicine: Indians and Alcohol In Early America (Cornell, 1995); Hakluyt’s Promise: an Elizabethan’s Obsession for an English America (Yale, 2007); and Fatal Journey: The Final Expedition of Henry Hudson--a Tale of Mutiny  and Murder in the Arctic (Basic Books, 2009); and the editor of ten books, including Travel Narratives A  from the Age of Discovery (Oxford, 2006) and The Atlantic World and Virginia 1550-1624 (Omohundro Institute/University of North Carolina, 2007).


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Stephen R. Mandell

During their long collaboration, Laurie Kirszner and Stephen Mandell have written a number of best-selling college texts for Bedford/St. Martin's, including Patterns for College Writing, Foundations First, Writing First, Focus on Writing, and, most recently, Practical Argument. Laurie Kirszner is a Professor of English, Emeritus at the University of the Sciences, where she has taught composition, literature, creative writing, and scientific writing, and served as coordinator of the first-year writing program.  Stephen Mandell is a Professor of English at Drexel University, where he founded and directed the basic writing program and has taught composition, literature, speech, and technical and business writing.


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Kate Mangelsdorf

Kate Mangelsdorf is professor of English and director of rhetoric and developmental English at the University of Texas at El Paso, where she has also been director of composition and associate dean of University College. She was formerly coordinator of ESL writing at the University of Arizona, and she has also taught at Yavapai Community College. Mangelsdorf has published articles in the Journal of Second Language Writing, English Language Teaching Journal, and Teaching English in the Two Year College.


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N. Gregory Mankiw

N. Gregory Mankiw is a Professor of Economics at Harvard University.  He began his study of economics at Princeton University, where he received an A.B. in 1980.  After earning a Ph.D. in economics from MIT, he began teaching at Harvard in 1985 and was promoted to full professor in 1987.  Professor Mankiwis a regular participant in academic and policy debates.  His research ranges across macroeconomics and includes work on price adjustment, consumer behavior, fanancial markets, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.  In addition to his duties at Harvard, he has been a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a member of the Brookings Panel on Economic Activity, and an adviser to the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and the Congressional Budget Office.  From 2003 to 2005 he was chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisers.


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Anthony Marcus

Anthony Marcus is an Associate Professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York. He has published books and articles on the history of law, urban public policy, African American culture, and economic and social development in America and abroad. His current research focuses on law, youth, and public health.


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Mike Markel

Mike Markel is director of technical communication at Boise State University, where he teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses. The former editor of IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, he is the author of numerous articles and six books about technical communication, including Ethics and Technical Communication: A Critique and Synthesis. His latest book is Big Sick Heart, a mystery.


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Michael R. Marrus

Michael R. Marrus teaches law and history at the University of Toronto, and is a member of the Order of Canada and a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.  An internationally renowned Holocaust scholar, Marrus is the author of seven books, including the award-winning Vichy France and the Jews (1981, 1995), written with Robert O. Paxton, and The Holocaust in History (1987). He has been a Guggenheim Fellow, a visiting professor at UCLA and Cape Town University, and a visiting fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies of the Hebrew University and St. Antony’s College, Oxford.  His most recent book is Some Measure of Justice: The Holocaust Era Restitution Campaign of the 1990s.


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Benjamin Marschke

Benjamin Marschke (Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles) is associate professor of history at Humboldt State University. A specialist in early modern German history, Marschke has contributed to numerous publications and is the author of Absolutely Pietist: Patronage, Factionalism, and State-Building in the Early Eighteenth-Century Prussian Army Chaplaincy and co-editor of The Holy Roman Empire, Reconsidered.


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Thomas R. Martin

Thomas R. Martin (PhD, Harvard University) is Jeremiah O’Connor Professor in Classics at the College of the Holy Cross. He is the author of Sovereignty and Coinage in Classical Greece and Ancient Greece, and is one of the originators of Perseus: Interactive Sources and Studies on Ancient Greece (www.perseus.tufts.edu). He is currently conducting research on the career of Pericles as a political leader in classical Athens as well as on the text of Josephus' Jewish War.


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Waldo E. Martin Jr.

Waldo E. Martin Jr. is professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley. His scholarly and teaching interests include modern American history and culture with an emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; his principal areas of research and writing are African American intellectual and cultural history. He is the author of "A Change is Gonna Come": Black Movement, Culture, and the Transformation of America 1945-1975 (forthcoming) and The Mind of Frederick Douglass (1985); he coedited, with Patricia Sullivan, The Encyclopedia of Civil Rights in the Untied States (forthcoming). Martin has published numerous articles and lectured widely on Frederick Douglass and on modern African American cultural and intellectual history.


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Displaying 1-15 of 91