Displaying 61-75 of 91

Joan T. Mims

Joan T. Mims is currently Vice President for Education Services at Oak Hill Technology, Inc., in Austin, Texas.  She develops and manages test development programs for numerous states and assessment companies and oversees constructed response scoring projects for subjects ranging from Braille to foreign languages (including American Sign Communication) as well as English Language Arts and Reading.  She has taught high school French and English and taught composition at the university level for thirteen years before shifting to university administration.  Mims also spent five years with the Texas Education Agency overseeing composition scoring and working in multiple aspects of test development and administration.  Reading and travel are her favorite leisure activities.


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Kathleen Miranda

Kathleen Miranda, Ed.D from St. John's University, is an Emeritus Associate Professor of the State University of New York (SUNY) where she taught for 25 years. Kathleen is a recipient of the prestigious New York State Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, and particularly enjoys teaching mathematics to underprepared and fearful students.  In addition to her extensive classroom experience, Kathleen has worked an accuracy reviewer and solutions author on several mathematics textbooks, including Michael Sullivan’s Brief Calculus and Finite Mathematics. Kathleen’s goal is to help students unlock the complexities of calculus and appreciate its many applications.
 
Kathleen has four children: Edward, a plastic surgeon in San Francisco, James, an emergency medicine physician in Philadelphia, Kathleen, a chemical engineer, working on vaccines, and Michael, a management consultant specializing in corporate strategy.


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Robert G. Moeller

Robert G. Moeller (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley) is professor of history at the University of California, Irvine. His work focuses on the history of Germany in the twentieth century, with an emphasis on social history and women’s history. His books include War Stories: The Search for a Usable Past in the Federal Republic of Germany (2001), Protecting Motherhood: Women and the Family in the Politics of Postwar West Germany (1993), and German Peasants and Agrarian Politics, 1914-1924: The Rhineland and Westphalia, 1914-1924 (1986). Moeller is faculty advisor for the UCI History Project, a professional development initiative for middle and high school teachers in Orange County, California.


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Ryan Moeller

Ryan M. Moeller earned his PhD from the University of Arizona, where he studied the cultural and pedagogical import of video and computer games with Ken McAllister, a leader in this groundbreaking new field. He is principal investigator for the Learning Games Initiative (LGI), an interdisciplinary and inter-institutional consortium made up of scholars and researchers studying computer games and gaming culture. As Assistant Professor of rhetoric and technology in the English department at Utah State University he employs a teaching philosophy that emphasizes play, through games or writing, as critical to the social process of learning.


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Daryl R. Moen

Daryl R. Moen is professor of journalism at the University of Missouri School of Journalism and former editor of three daily newspapers. Moen is also coauthor of Telling the Story, Fourth Edition (2010) and Beyond the Inverted Pyramid (1993), and author of Newspaper Layout and Design, Fourth Edition (2000).


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Jerry R. Mohrig

Jerry Mohrig spent his entire professional career as a college teacher. He retired in 2003 from Carleton College as Stark Professor in the Natural Sciences and Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus. Actively involved in science education reform for many years, Jerry was a founding member of the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) and of Project Kaleidoscope. From 1997 until 2000 he was Chair of the ACS Committee on Professional Training. During his career Jerry collaborated on chemical research with over 150 undergraduates and published many articles on the stereochemistry of organic addition-elimination and proton-transfer reactions. His first textbook for the organic chemistry laboratory was published in 1968 and over the years he developed several new experiments for the organic lab. His major recent interest is bringing more effective student learning to the organic chemistry lab through the use of guided-inquiry projects and experiments. Jerry has been honored with the CUR Fellow Award, the Briscoe Lectureship at Indiana University, the James Flack Norris Award of the ACS, and the Catalyst Award of the Chemical Manufacturers Association for excellence in the teaching of chemistry.


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David S. Moore

David S. Moore is Shanti S. Gupta Distinguished Professor of Statistics, Emeritus, at Purdue University and was 1998 president of the American Statistical Association. He received his A.B. from Princeton and his Ph.D. from Cornell, both in mathematics. He has written many research papers in statistical theory and served on the editorial boards of several major journals. Professor Moore is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He has served as program director for statistics and probability at the National Science Foundation.  In recent years, Professor Moore has devoted his attention to the teaching of statistics. He was the content developer for the Annenberg/Corporation for Public Broadcasting college-level telecourse Against All Odds: Inside Statistics and for the series of video modules Statistics: Decisions through Data, intended to aid the teaching of statistics in schools. He is the author of influential articles on statistics education and of several leading texts. Professor Moore has served as president of the International Association for Statistical Education and has received the Mathematical Association of America’s national award for distinguished college or university teaching of mathematics.


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David S. Moore

David S. Moore is Shanti S. Gupta Distinguished Professor of Statistics, Emeritus, at Purdue University and was 1998 president of the American Statistical Association. He received his A.B. from Princeton and his Ph.D. from Cornell, both in mathematics. He has written many research papers in statistical theory and served on the editorial boards of several major journals. Professor Moore is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He has served as program director for statistics and probability at the National Science Foundation.  In recent years, Professor Moore has devoted his attention to the teaching of statistics. He was the content developer for the Annenberg/Corporation for Public Broadcasting college-level telecourse Against All Odds: Inside Statistics and for the series of video modules Statistics: Decisions through Data, intended to aid the teaching of statistics in schools. He is the author of influential articles on statistics education and of several leading texts. Professor Moore has served as president of the International Association for Statistical Education and has received the Mathematical Association of America’s national award for distinguished college or university teaching of mathematics.


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Thomas L. Moore

Thomas Moore earned a B.A. from Carleton College, an M.S. from the University of Iowa, and a Ph.D. from Dartmouth.  He has been on the faculty at Grinnell College since 1980 and has concentrated his scholarship on statistics education.  He chaired the Statistics Education Section of ASA in 1995 and the MAA's SIGMAA for Statistics Education in 2004.  He is a Fellow of American Statistical Association and was the2008 Mu Sigma Rho Statistical Education Award winner.


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Miriam Moore

Miriam Moore (BA, Baylor University; MA, PhD, University of South Carolina) discovered her passion for teaching over 20 years ago when, as a graduate student, she worked with ESL writers in a sheltered section of first-year composition.  Since then, she has taught in a state university, an intensive English program, an industry-sponsored ESL program, and two community colleges.  Whether teaching developmental writing, literacy, ESL grammar, reading, or first-year composition, her focus is the same:  to introduce students to academic culture and provide instruction that will help them succeed in their academic programs.  She is currently professor of English and ESL at Lord Fairfax Community College in Middletown, Virginia, where she is developing an expanded ESL program and leading the College’s implementation of the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) redesign of development English.  In 2011-2012, she served on the team which developed the integrated curriculum for the VCCS redesign, and she has presented strategies for teaching developmental and ESL courses at local, state, regional, and national conferences.


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Displaying 61-75 of 91