Displaying 61-75 of 118

Ronald Mellor

Ronald Mellor (PhD, Princeton University) is Distinguished Professor of ancient history at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he served as chair of the history department from 1992 to 1997. Centering his research on ancient religion and Roman historiography, Professor Mellor has written eight scholarly books: Tacitus’ “Annals”  (2010); The Roman Historians (1999); Text and Tradition: Studies in Greek History and Historiography in Honor of Mortimer Chambers (ed. 1999); The Historians of Ancient Rome (ed. 1997); Tacitus: The Classical Heritage (1995); Tacitus (1993); From Augustus to Nero: The First Dynasty of Imperial Rome (ed. 1990); and Thea Rome: The Goddess Roma in the Greek World (1975). Professor Mellor is the co-Director of the History-Geography Project at UCLA, which brings university faculty together with K-12 teachers.  He has also coedited a series of nine volumes on ancient history for middle and high schools.  For that series, he is coauthor of The Ancient Roman World and The World in Ancient Times: Primary Sources.


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Herman Melville

Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was the author of such classics as Billy Budd and Moby Dick.


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Louis Menand

Louis Menand is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Metaphysical Club and American Studies. He is the Distinguished Professor of English at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and a staff writer at The New Yorker.


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Kirsten Menking

Kirsten Menking is an environmental Earth scientist in the Department of Earth Science and Geography at Vassar College. Her research interests include using lake sediments to unravel Earth’s history of climatic change, linking this history to atmospheric and hydrologic processes through a combination of numerical modeling experiments and collection of weather and stream discharge data, analyzing the evolution of landforms in response to climatic and tectonic processes, and studying the impacts of urbanization on streams. She has published journal articles documenting glacial–interglacial cycles in the Sierra Nevada mountains and adjacent Owens Valley of California, determined the climatic conditions necessary to produce a Pleistocene lake in the now-dry Estancia Basin of New Mexico, and un-covered a centuries-long mid-Holocene drought in New York’s Hudson River valley. Her current research involves quantifying the amount of road salt entering the groundwater system,a topic of concern both for people dependent on well water and for aquatic ecosystems.


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Ramesh Menon

Ramesh Menon is the author of Blue God: A Life of Krishna and The Hunt for K, a national bestseller in India. A former journalist, he lives in Kodaikanal, India.


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Eduardo Mercado

Eduardo Mercado is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at University at Buffalo, The State University of New York.  His research focuses on how different brain systems interact to develop representations of experienced events, and how these representations change over time.  Dr. Mercado currently uses techniques from experimental psychology, computational neuroscience, electrical engineering, and behavioral neuroscience to explore questions about auditory learning and memory in rodents, cetaceans, and humans.


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Laurie Mercier

Laurie Mercier is Professor of History, Washington State University, Vancouver. She is the author of Anaconda: Labor, Community and Culture in Montana’s Smelter City (2001) and The 1970s Social History of the United States (2008), and coeditor (with Jaclyn Gier) of Mining Women: Gender in the Development of a Global Industry, 1670-2005 (2006). She is a former president of the Oral History Association and coauthor (with Madeline Buckendorf) of Using Oral History in Community History Projects (2007).



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James H. Merrell

James Merrell (PhD, The Johns Hopkins University) is Lucy Maynard Salmon Professor of History at Vassar College. An award-winning scholar of American Indian history, Merrell has published a number of books and articles, including Into the American Woods: Negotiators on the Pennsylvania Frontier (1999), winner of the 2000 Bancroft Prize for history and finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and The Indians’ New World: Catawbas and their Neighbors From European Contact through the Era of Removal (1989), winner in 1990 of the Bancroft Prize, the Frederick Jackson Turner Award, and the Merle Curti Award.


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Dorothy Merritts

Dorothy Merritts is a geologist with expertise on streams, rivers, and the impact of humans and geologic hazards on landscape evolution. In the western United States, she conducted research on the San Andreas Fault of coastal California, and her international work focuses on fault movements in South Korea, Indonesia, Australia, and Costa Rica. Her primary research in the eastern United States is in the Appalachian Mountains and Piedmont, particularly in the mid-Atlantic region, where she is investigating the role of climate change and human activities in transforming the valley bottom landscapes and waterways of Eastern North America. Recently she partnered with other scientists and policy makers from multiple state and national government agencies to develop and test a new approach to stream and wetland restoration. She is a professor in the Department of Earth and Environment at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She is an author or co-author of more than 70 scientific articles, and the editor and contributing writer for numerous scientific books and field guides.


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Michael Meyer

Michael Meyer has taught writing and literature courses for more than thirty years—since 1981 at the University of Connecticut and before that at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and the College of William and Mary. In addition to being an experienced teacher, Meyer is a highly regarded literary scholar. His scholarly articles have appeared in distinguished journals such as American Literature, Studies in the American Renaissance, and Virginia Quarterly Review. An internationally recognized authority on Henry David Thoreau, Meyer is a former president of the Thoreau Society and coauthor (with Walter Harding) of The New Thoreau Handbook, a standard reference source. The American Studies Association awarded his first book, Several More Lives to Live: Thoreau’s Political Reputation in America, the Ralph Henry Gabriel Prize. . He is also the editor of Frederick Douglass: The Narrative and Selected Writings. He has lectured on a variety of American literary topics from Cambridge University to Peking University. His books for Bedford/St. Martin's include The Bedford Introduction to Literature; The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature; Literature to Go; Poetry: An Introduction; and Thinking and Writing about Literature.


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Walter Benn Michaels

Walter Benn Michaels is a professor of English at the University of Illinois at Chicago. “One of the most influential Americanists of his generation” (The Chronicle of Higher Education), he is the author of Our America and has contributed to The New York Times Magazine, The Boston Globe, and n+1. He lives in Chicago.


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Displaying 61-75 of 118