Displaying 1-15 of 18

David Nachmias

David Nachmias is a Senior Fellow Emeritus at the Israel Democracy Institute (IDI) and holds the Romulo Betancourt Chair in Political Science at Tel Aviv University. Professor Nachmias has extensively published and presented papers in the areas of Political Science, Public Administration and Public Policy, both in Israel and abroad. He now serves on the editorial board of Policy Studies Review; and is a member of the American Political Science Association; Midwest Political Science Association; Policy Studies Organization; the International Political Science Association and Israel's Political Science Association. His numerous books and articles include: Public Policy in Israel, Frank Cass, 2002; Executive Governance in Israel, Patgrave, 2002 "The Bias of Pluralism: The Redistributive Consequences of Israel's New Electoral Law" in A. Arian and Michal Shamir (eds.) The Elections in Israel - 1996, State University of New York Press, 1999.


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Elizabeth J. Natalle

Elizabeth J. Natalle is Associate Professor at University of North Carolina, Greensboro, as well as Director of the International Exchange Program with Vaxjo University in Sweden. She serves on both the Honors Program and Women’s and Gender Studies Program faculty. In 2003 she was a recipient of the UNCG College of Arts and Sciences Teaching Excellence Award. In addition to her vast teaching experience, Natalle also serves as a professional consultant, helping individuals such as state government managers, corporate managers, hospital social workers, city employees, student officers in university organizations, attorneys, university faculty and staff, speech and hearing clinicians, and employees of the Federal Judiciary improve their interpersonal communication skills. With regard to research, Natalle has devoted much of her time to gendered communication processes, including conflict management, workplace relationships, and cultural comparisons. Her publications have appeared in journals such as Western Journal of Communication, Communication Education, Women’s Studies in Communication, and Management Communication Quarterly.


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Jenae M. Neiderhiser

Jenae M. Neiderhiser is Liberal Arts Research Professor of Psychology at The Pennsylvania State University. After receiving her Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Studies from The Pennsylvania State University in 1994, she joined the faculty of the Center for Family Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C., advancing from Assistant Research Professor to Professor from 1994 to 2007. In 2007 she joined the Department of Psychology at The Pennsylvania State University and also holds the appointment of Professor of Human Development and affiliate scientist at the Oregon Social Learning Center. Neiderhiser’s work has focused on how genes and environments work together throughout the lifespan. She has had a particular focus on genotype-environment correlation and how individuals shape their own environments, especially within the family. In her pursuit of this question she has collaborated on developing a number of novel or underutilized research designs including the Extended Children of Twins and an ongoing prospective adoption study, the Early Growth and Development Study. Neiderhiser is an associate editor for the Journal of Research on Adolescence and Frontiers in Behavioral and Psychiatric Genetics and is on the editorial board of several developmental psychology journals.


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David L. Nelson

David L. Nelson is Professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.  He is also the Academic Program Director for university's Institute for Cross-college Biology Education.


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Philip Nelson

Philip Nelson is Professor of Physics at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his A.B. from Princeton University (1980) and Ph.D. from Harvard University (1984). Dr. Nelson serves on the Biophysical Society’s Education Committee; he received Penn’s highest teaching award in 2001, in part for creating the course that formed the basis for this book. Dr. Nelson was recently elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society.


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Roderick P. Neumann

Roderick P. Neumann is a professor of geography in the Department of Global and Sociocultural Studies at Florida International University. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley. He studies the complex interactions of culture and nature through a specific focus on national parks and natural resources. In his research, he combines the analytical tools of cultural and political ecology with landscape studies. He has pursued these investigations through historical and ethnographic research mostly in East Africa, with some comparative work in North America and Central America. His current research explores interwoven narratives of nature, landscape, and identity in the European Union, with a particular emphasis on Spain. His scholarly books include Imposing Wilderness: Struggles over Livelihoods and Nature Preservation in Africa (1998), Making Political Ecology (2005), and The Commercialization of Non-Timber Forest Products (2000), the latter coauthored with Eric Hirsch.


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Beth Newman

Beth Newman is an associate professor of English at Southern Methodist University.  Her publications include Subjects on Display: Psychoanalysis, Social Expectation, and Victorian Femininity (Ohio UP, 2005), an edition of Wuthering Heights for Broadview Press, and scholarly articles on nineteenth-century fiction that have appeared in ELH, PMLA, NOVEL, and Criticism.


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Susan Nickerson

Susan Nickerson is an Associate Professor in San Diego State University's Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Her research interest is long-term professional development of elementary and middle school teachers. In particular, her focus is describing, analyzing, and understanding effective contexts that promote teachers' knowledge of mathematics and mathematics teaching.


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Solomon A. Nigosian

S. A. Nigosian, a research associate at Victoria College of the University of Toronto, has been teaching in the Religion Department for over twenty-five years. His most recent publications include Islam: Its History, Teaching, and Practices (2004); From Ancient Writings to Sacred Texts: The Old Testament and Apocrypha (2004); and The Zoroastrian Faith: Tradition and Modern Research (1993). His articles on Near Eastern Religions and the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament are published frequently in professional journals such as Studies in Religion, Journal of Asian and African Studies, Theological Review, Vetus Testamentum, Ephemerides Theologicae Lovanienses, and Biblica.


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Matthew K. Nock

Matthew Nock is a Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. Matt received his B.A. from Boston University (1995) and his Ph.D. from Yale University (2003), and he completed his clinical internship at Bellevue Hospital and the New York University Child Study Center (2003). Matt joined the faculty of Harvard University in 2003 and has been there ever since. While an undergraduate, Matt became very interested in the question of why people do things to intentionally harm themselves, and he has been conducting research aimed at answering this question ever since. His research is multidisciplinary in nature and uses a range of methodological approaches (e.g., epidemiologic surveys, laboratory-based experiments, and clinic-based studies) to better understand how these behaviors develop, how to predict them, and how to prevent their occurrence. He has received multiple teaching awards at Harvard and also four early career awards recognizing his research, and in 2011, he was named a MacArthur Fellow.


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Alan Noell

Alan Noell has a B.A. degree in Mathematics from Texas A&M University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Mathematics from Princeton University. After a postdoctoral position at CalTech, in 1985 he joined the faculty at Oklahoma State University, where he is now Professor of Mathematics. He research interests are in the area of several complex variables. He has also enjoyed working in the area of curriculum development. His work has been supported by the National Science Foundation and other sources


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Susan A. Nolan

Susan A. Nolan is Professor of Psychology at Seton Hall University in New Jersey. A graduate of the College of the Holy Cross, she earned her Ph.D. in psychology from Northwestern University. Susan researches interpersonal consequences of mental illness and the role of gender in science and technology fields. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation. Susan served as a nongovernmental representative  from the American Psychological Association (APA) to the United Nations for five years, and is Vice President for Diversity and International Relations of the Society for the Teaching of Psychology. She is the 2014–2015 President of the Eastern Psychological Association (EPA), and is a Fellow of both EPA and APA.


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Elizabeth M. Nollen

Elizabeth M. Nollen has taught basic writing, composition, film, and literature courses in the English department at West Chester University for the last twenty-one years. She has been active in the English component of precollege programs, given numerous papers at the Popular Culture Association, and has published Family Matters in the British and American Novel with Bowling Green State University Popular Press.


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Displaying 1-15 of 18