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Stephen Railton

Stephen Railton teaches American literature at the University of Virginia. The author of books on James Fenimore Cooper, the American Renaissance, and Mark Twain, as well as numerous articles, he is currently exploring the uses of electronic technology to advance the study and teaching of literature. Toward this end, he has created several large Web sites, including Mark Twain in His Times: An Electronic Archive, Uncle Tom’s Cabin and American Culture: A Multi-Media Archive, and FAULKNER AT VIRGINIA: AN AUDIO ARCHIVE.


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Jack N. Rakove

Jack Rakove is the W. R. Coe Professor of History and American Studies and professor of political science at Stanford University, where he has taught since 1980. He is the author of The Beginnings of National Politics: An Interpretive History of the Continental Congress (1979); James Madison and the Creation of the American Republic (revised edition, 2001); Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution (1996), which won the 1997 Pulitzer Prize in history; Declaring Rights: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin's, 1997); The Annotated U.S. Constitution and Declaration of Independence (Harvard, 2009); and Revolutionaries: A New History of the Invention of America (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2010). He has also contributed essays and articles to numerous scholarly collections, law reviews, and newspapers. In 1998 he testified at the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee hearings on the background and history of impeachment and has served as a consultant and expert witness in the recent litigation over the use of sampling procedures in the decennial federal census.


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Mary Lynn Rampolla

Mary Lynn Rampolla (PhD, University of Toronto) is associate professor of history at Trinity Washington University in Washington, D.C., and she chairs the History Program at Trinity (Washington) University.  Her scholarly work focuses on medieval and early modern Europe, and her publications include articles in Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies and entries in the Dictionary of the Middle Ages.  She has several articles in an encyclopedia called Holy People of the World.  She is active in the fields of history and composition and frequently presents papers at the annual International Medieval Congress at the University of Western Michigan.


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David Randall

David Randall is Chair Professor and Head of Biology and Chemistry at the City University of Hong Kong, a position he previously held from 2003-2006. He received his Ph.D from the University of Southampton, UK in 1963 and then joined the Faculty of the University of British Columbia, where he was appointed Professor in 1973 and Professor Emeritus in 2003. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1981. Randall received the Fry Medal from the Canadian Society of Zoologists in 1993, the Award of Excellence from the American Fisheries Society in 1994 and the Murray Newman Award for excellence in Fisheries Research in 2009. David Randall has been a visiting Professor at Universities of Nairobi (1988); George Washington (1988/89); and in Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (1997). He has worked in many Institutions around the world including the Max Planck Institute, Gottingen, Germany; marine stations in Naples, Italy; Plymouth, UK; Port Aransas, Texas; USA; and Bamfield, BC, Canada. David Randall has authored more than three hundred original papers and has edited and contributed to many books, including the series on Fish Physiology (26+ volumes) and many Springer Verlag publications.


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Don Ranly

Don Ranly, professor emeritus of journalism at the University of Missouri School of Journalism, was formerly director of the magazine sequence at the school for twenty-eight years.   He is coauthor of News Reporting and Writing, Tenth Edition (2011), Telling the Story, Fourth Edition (2010), and Beyond the Inverted Pyramid (1993), and is the author of Publication Editing (1999), and the editor of Principles of American Journalism (1997). He has conducted more than 1,000 writing, editing, and publishing seminars for corporations, associations and organizations, and individual magazine, newspaper, and publishing companies.


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Supryia M. Ray

Supryia M. Ray is a writer, editor, and English teacher. A summa cum laude graduate of the University of Miami, she has assisted Ross Murfin in the research and preparation of more than a dozen volumes in the Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism series and authored "Contextual Documents and Illustrations" for the second edition of The Scarlet Letter. She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1998, served as a law clerk on the U.S. District Court and the U.S. Court of Appeals, entered private practice as a litigator, and then performed public-interest environmental advocacy in Washington, D.C. She also served for two years with Literacy AmeriCorps, teaching adult learners a variety of subjects including English, reading, writing, and public speaking. She now divides her time between teaching and writing.


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Margaret Ray

Margaret Ray is Professor of Economics at the University of Mary Washington, where she specializes in teaching introductory economics. She received her BS in Economics from Oklahoma State University and her PhD in Economics from the University of Tennessee. Her research is primarily in the areas of economic education and equine industry economics. In 2003 she taught AP economics at Collegiate School in Virginia. Ray received the National Council on Economic Education’s Excellence in Teaching Economics award in 1991. She has been involved in the AP Economics program since 1992, serving as a reader and question leader, writing test items, overseeing the AP course audit, writing College Board “Special Focus” articles, and contributing activities to the National Council on Economic Education’s AP Economics resource. She has been a College Board Endorsed Consultant for economics since 2001 and she conducts several professional development workshops and institutes each year. She currently serves on the Steering Committee for the College Board’s AP National Conference.


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Geoff Rayner-Canham

After completing his Ph.D. in transition metal chemistry at Imperial College, London, England, Geoff Rayner-Canham has spent his career mainly at the Grenfell Campus of Memorial University, Newfoundland, Canada, together with sabbatical leaves at such diverse places as the Colorado School of Mines and the University of California, Santa Cruz. Being unable to find an inorganic chemistry text which used the concepts to explain the properties and uses of the chemical elements and compounds, he, subsequently joined by Tina Overton, authored Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry. The text is now entering its sixth edition, and has been translated into Spanish, Korean, Japanese, German, Portuguese, and Khmer. Geoff has authored many publications relevant to the teaching of inorganic chemistry, including several on novel aspects of the Periodic Table. Recognition of his contributions to the teaching of chemistry have included the Chemistry Education Award of the Chemical Institute of Canada, and the National Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada PromoScience Award. Researching the life and work of pioneering women chemists is another of his activities, this work resulting in several books co-authored with Marelene Rayner-Canham.


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Raelyn Rediske

Raelyn Rediske is a Research Assistant with the Delta Program in Research, Teaching, and Learning and a graduate student in the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  She earned her B.S. in Biological Anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her Masters in Education from the Ohio State University in Math, Science, and Technology Education.  Her thesis research is focused on science communication.  She has developed and taught science classes for local outreach programs for the past 10 years and teaches integrated science-language arts classes online for middle school students.


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Janie Rees-Miller

Janie Rees-Miller is director of the English as a Second Language program at Marietta College, Ohio. In research and teaching, she is concerned with the interface between theory and practice and with making linguistics accessible to nonlinguists. She is coeditor with Mark Aronoff of The Handbook of Linguistics.


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Kevin Reilly

Kevin Reilly is a professor of humanities at Raritan Valley College and has taught at Rutgers, Columbia, and Princeton Universities. Cofounder and first president of the World History Association, Reilly has written numerous articles on the teaching of history, and has edited a number of works in world history including The Introductory History Course for the AHA and the World History syllabus collection. A specialist in immigration history, Reilly incorporated his research in creating the "Modern Global Migrations" globe at Ellis Island. His work on the history of racism led to the editing of Racism: A Global Reader. He was a Fulbright scholar in Brazil and Jordan and a NEH fellow in Greece, Oxford UK, and India. Awards include the Community College Humanities Association’s Distinguished Educator of the Year and the World History Association's Pioneer Award. He has also served the American Historical Association in various capacities, including the governing Council. He is currently writing a global history of racism.


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Displaying 1-15 of 60