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Rick Relyea

RICK RELYEA is Professor of Biology at the University of Pittsburgh, where he has been on the faculty since 1999. In 2005, he was named the Chancellor’s Distinguished Researcher at the University of Pittsburgh. Professor Rick Relyea is a recipient of the University of Pittsburgh’s 2014 Tina and David Bellet Teaching Excellence. Since 2007, he has also served as the director of the University of Pittsburgh's field station, the Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology, where he oversees a diverse set of ecological field courses and facilitates researchers from around the world. Rick has taught thousands of undergraduate students in introductory ecology, behavioral ecology, and evolution. His research is recognized throughout the world and has been published in the leading eco¬logical journals including Ecology, Ecology Letters, American Naturalist, and PNAS. The research spans a wide range of ecological and evolutionary topics including animal behavior, sexual selection, ecotoxicology, disease ecology, phenotypic plasticity, community ecology, ecosystem ecology, and landscape ecology. Rick's research focuses on aquatic habitats and the diversity of species that live in these ecosystems. He strives to integrate different areas of ecology in ways that provide new discoveries and applications.


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Ellen Kuhl Repetto

Ellen Kuhl Repetto (M.A., University of Massachusetts Boston) is a freelance editor and writer who has contributed to more than twenty composition readers, handbooks, and rhetorics. She is the author of The Bedford/St. Martin's Textbook Reader (2003), Readings for Discoveries: A Collection of Short Essays (2006), and Hope over Hardship: A History of the Boston Home, 1881 - 2006 (2007).


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Russell Revlin

Russell Revlin is associate professor of psychology at the University of California–Santa Barbara. His academic journey began when, as a biopsychology student, he came across a tattered book on reasoning and problem solving at UCLA that expanded his view of psychology. The following year he was graduate student in cognitive psychology at Carnegie Mellon University, where he earned a PhD. After a postdoctoral fellowship in psycholinguistics from Stanford University, Dr. Revlin established his laboratory in human inference, focusing on how memory, language, and imaginal processes contribute to our ability to reason about novel situations and domains.


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Nedra Reynolds

Nedra Reynolds is Professor and Department Chair of Writing and Rhetoric at the University of Rhode Island.  She is the author of Geographies of Writing: Inhabiting Places and Encountering Difference (Southern Illinois University Press, 2004) as well as co-author with Elizabeth Davis of Portfolio Keeping: A Guide for Students, (Third Edition, Bedford/St. Martin’s 2013).  She has coedited The Bedford Bibliography for Teachers of Writing (Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Editions). Her articles have appeared in Rhetoric Review, Journal of Advanced Composition, College Composition and Communication, Writing Program Administration, Pedagogy, and a number of edited collections.


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David H. Richter

David H. Richter (PhD, University of Chicago) is professor and director of graduate studies in the English Department at Queens College and professor of English at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Richter publishes in the fields of narrative theory and eighteenth-century literature. Recent titles include The Progress of Romance: Literary Historiography and the Gothic Novel (1996); Ideology and Form in Eighteenth-Century Literature (1999); and The Critical Tradition (Bedford/St. Martin's, 1998), and he is currently at work on two critical books: a cultural history of true crime fiction and an analysis of difficulty in biblical narrative.


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Christoph Richter

Christoph Richter is Lecturer in the Department of Biology at the University of Toronto – Mississauga, where he has been on the faculty since 2011. He began his teaching career in 2002 at Queen’s University, where he was recognized for his excellence in teaching. Since then, he has taught undergraduate courses on many topics including animal behaviour, vertebrate biology, marine mammalogy, biological diversity, introductory ecology, and statistics. He strives to engage students by making course content meaningful and by demonstrating the dynamic nature of scientific research. His teaching has taken him from the Arctic to the Gulf of Maine.

Christoph earned a M.Sc. from Memorial University of Newfoundland and a Ph.D. from Otago University, New Zealand. His research focused on the impacts of human activities, such as fishing, whale watching, and oil exploration, on the behaviour of cetaceans. He studied humpback whales, harbour porpoises and sperm whales off Newfoundland and New Zealand and in the Bay of Fundy and the Gulf of Mexico.

Christoph’s current research focuses on improving pedagogical performance. He is studying how opinion and knowledge of evolutionary concepts change throughout the undergraduate programme and what factors influence student academic success.

 


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Robert E. Ricklefs

ROBERT E. RICKLEFS is Curators' Professor of Biology at the University of Missouri–St. Louis, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1995. His teaching at Missouri, and previously at the University of Pennsylvania, has included courses in introductory and advanced ecology, biogeography, evolution, and biological statistics. Bob’s research has addressed a broad range of topics in ecology and evolutionary biology, from the adaptive significance of life-history traits of birds, to island biogeography and the community relationships of birds, herbivorous insects, and forest trees. In particular, he has championed the importance of recognizing the impact of large-scale processes on local ecological assemblages of species. Bob has published in numerous journals including Science, Nature, PNAS, Evolution, Ecology, Ecology Letters, and the American Naturalist. His contributions have been recognized by honorary doctorates from the Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium), Aarhus University (Denmark), and the University of Burgundy (France). He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences of the United States. Bob published the first edition of The Economy of Nature in 1976 and is joined by a coauthor for the first time with this seventh edition.


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Jack Ridl

Jack Ridl is Professor Emeritus of English at Hope College where he taught courses in literature, essay writing, poetry writing, and the nature of poetry for thirty-five years. He has published six volumes of poetry and more than two hundred poems in some fifty literary magazines; his most recent collection, Broken Symmetry, was selected by the Society of Midland Authors as one of the two best volumes of poetry published in 2006. His chapbook Against Elegies received the 2001 Letterpress Award from the Center for Book Arts. His recognitions for teaching excellence include the Hope Outstanding Professor-Educator award at Hope College for 1976, the Michigan Teacher of the Year award from the Carnegie Foundation in 1996, and the Favorite Faculty/Staff Member award at Hope College in 2003. For Bedford/St. Martin’s, with Peter Schakel he coedited Approaching Poetry (1997) and 250 Poems (2003); and he is coeditor with Janet Gardner, Beverley Lawn, and Peter Schakel of Literature: a Portable Anthology (2004).


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John Paul Riquelme

John Paul Riquelme is a professor of English at Boston University.  His publications include Teller and Tale in Joyce's Fiction: Oscillating Perspectives (1983); Harmony and Dissonances: T.S. Eliot, Romanticism, and Imagination (1991); and several edited collections of essays: by the Swiss critic Fritz Senn, Joyce's Dislocutions: Essays on Reading as Translation (1984); Gothic & Modernism: Essaying Dark Literary Modernity (2008); and critical responses to T. S. Eliot (2009).  He is currently at work on studies focusing on Oscar Wilde's relation to modernism and on the cultural logic of nineteenth-century gothic narratives, as well as a special issue of Modern Fiction Studies concerning Modernist Life Narratives.


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