Displaying 31-45 of 60

James L. Roark

James L. Roark (Ph.D., Stanford University) is Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of American History at Emory University. In 1993, he received the Emory Williams Distinguished Teaching Award, and in 2001–2002 he was Pitt Professor of American Institutions at Cambridge University. He has written Masters without Slaves: Southern Planters in the Civil War and Reconstruction and coauthored Black Masters: A Free Family of Color in the Old South with Michael P. Johnson.


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Randy Roberts

Randy Roberts is Distinguished Professor of History at Purdue University. His primary research areas are sports and popular culture within the larger context of recent American history. He is an award-winning biographer and is highly visible in the field of post-1945 American history. Among his more important books are Heavy Justice: The State of Indiana v. Michael G. Tyson (1994); Jack Dempsey: The Manassa Mauler (1979); Papa Jack: Jack Johnson and the Era of White Hopes (1983); “But They Can’t Beat Us”: Oscar Robertson and the Crispus Attucks Tigers (1999); and Joe Louis: Hard Times Man (2010); and with James S. Olson, John Wayne American (1995); A Line in the Sand: The Alamo in Blood and Memory (2000); Winning Is the Only Thing: Sports in America Since 1945 (1989); and Where the Domino Fell: America and Vietnam, 1945-1990 (1989). Roberts has served frequently as a consultant for PBS News, HBO, and the History Channel.


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Duane Roen

Duane Roen, is a Professor of English and serves as Assistant Vice Provost for University Academic Success Programs at Arizona State University.  He also serves as faculty head of Interdisciplinary and Liberal Studies as well as head of Technical Communication. At ASU, Duane previously served as faculty head of Humanities and Arts, and he directed the Center for Learning and Teaching Excellence and the writing program.  Roen is secretary of the Conference on College Composition and Communication and vice president of the Council of Writing Program Administrators. He has published eight books on writing, and he has authored or coauthored more than two hundred chapters, articles, and conference papers.


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Jon Rogawski

Jon Rogawski received his undergraduate degree (and simultaneously a master's degree in mathematics) at Yale, and a Ph.D. in mathematics from Princeton University, where he studied under Robert Langlands. Prior to joining the Department of Mathematics at UCLA, where he is currently Full Professor, he held teaching positions at Yale and the University of Chicago, and research positions at the Institute for Advanced Study and University of Bonn. Jon's areas of interest are number theory, automorphic forms, and harmonic analysis on semisimple groups. He has published numerous research articles in leading mathematical journals, including a research monograph entitled Automorphic Representations of Unitary Groups in Three Variables (Princeton University Press). He is the recipient of a Sloan Fellowship and an editor of The Pacific Journal of Mathematics. Jon and his wife Julie, a physician in family practice, have four children. They run a busy household and, whenever possible, enjoy family vacations in the mountains of California. Jon is a passionate classical music lover and plays the violin and classical guitar.


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F. James Rohlf

F. James Rohlf has taught a graduate-level course on Biometry at the University of California at Santa Barbara, the University of Kansas, and at Stony Brook University in addition to courses on multivariate statistics and geometric morphometrics. He has also taught many short courses and intensive workshops on statistical topics at many institutions around the world.  He received his Ph.D. degree from the University of Kansas in 1962.  Dr. Rohlf’ research has focused on the development and interpretation of multivariate methods in biology – especially for geometric morphometric applications in ecological and evolutionary studies. His original research has been published journals such as Systematic Biology, Evolution, Journal of Human Evolution, Journal of Classification, and the American Journal of Physical Anthropology. He is a statistical reviewer for a large number of journals as well as for granting agencies in several countries. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  Presently, Dr. Rohlf is a John S. Toll Professor at Stony Brook University and a member of the New York Consortium in Evolutionary Primatology.


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Alfred Rosa

Paul Eschholz and Alfred Rosa are professors emeriti of English at the University of Vermont. They have directed statewide writing programs and conducted numerous workshops throughout the country on writing and the teaching of writing.  Eschholz and Rosa have collaborated on a number of best-selling texts for Bedford/St. Martin's, including Subject & Strategy, Eleventh Edition (2008); Outlooks and Insights: A Reader for College Writers, Fourth Edition (1995); with Virginia Clark, Language Awareness, Tenth Edition (2009); and, with Virginia Clark and Beth Simon, Language: Readings in Language and Culture, Seventh Edition (2007).


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Mike Rose

Mike Rose, a professor in the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, is one of the most prominent names in composition studies. He has produced important work in remedial reading and writing, writing across the curriculum, the cognition of composing, and the politics of literacy. Among his books are Lives on the Boundary: The Struggles and Achievements of America's Underprepared (1989) and Possible Lives: The Promise of Public Education in America (1995). He has received numerous awards for his work in language and literacy, including awards from the National Academy of Education, the National Council of Teachers of English, the Modern Language Association, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Both in 1991 and 1992 he, as coauthor, won the prestigious Richard Braddock Award for the outstanding article published each year in College Composition and Communication. His most recent award is the 1997 Grawemeyer Award in Education for Possible Lives.  His newest trade books are The Mind at Work: Valuing the Intelligence of the American Worker and Why School?: Reclaiming Education for All of Us.


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Robin Rosenberg

Robin S. Rosenberg is a clinical psychologist in private practice and she has taught psychology courses at Lesley University and Harvard University. In addition, she is coauthor (along with Stephen Kosslyn) of Psychology in Context and Fundamentals of Psychology in Context. She is the editor of Psychology of Superheroes, and contributor to The Psychology of Harry Potter, and Batman Unauthorized. She is board certified in clinical psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology, and has been certified in clinical hypnosis. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Clinical Psychology and is a member of the Academy for Eating Disorders. She received her B.A. in psychology from New York University, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Rosenberg completed her clinical internship at Massachusetts Mental Health Center and had a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Community Health Plan before joining the staff at Newton-Wellesley Hospital’s Outpatient Services, where she worked before leaving to expand her private practice. Dr. Rosenberg specializes in treating people with depression, anxiety, and eating disorders, and is interested in the integration of different therapy approaches. She was the founder and coordinator of the New England Society for Psychotherapy Integration. Dr. Rosenberg enjoys using superhero stories to illustrate psychological principles, and can sometimes be found at comic conventions.


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Helena Rosenblatt

Helena Rosenblatt (PhD, Columbia) is a professor of history at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. A specialist in European intellectual history, she is the author of Liberal Values: Benjamin Constant and the Politics of Religion (2008) and Rousseau and Geneva: From the First Discourse to the Social Contract, 1749-1762 (1997), and she is the editor of The Cambridge Companion to Constant (2009).


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Barbara H. Rosenwein

Barbara H. Rosenwein (PhD, University of Chicago) is professor of history at Loyola University Chicago. She is the author or editor of several books, including A Short History of the Middle Ages and Emotional Communities in the Early Middle Ages. She is currently working on a general history of the emotions in the West.


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Roy Rosenzweig

Roy Rosenzweig (1950-2007), founder of the Center for History and New Media, was the Mark and Barbara Fried Professor of History at George Mason University. He has authored, coauthored, and edited numerous articles and books, including Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web; The Presence of the Past: Popular Uses of History in American Life; The Park and the People: A History of Central Park; and Eight Hours for What We Will: Workers and Leisure in an Industrial City, 1870-1920. Rosenzweig served as Vice-President for Research of the American Historical Association and was awarded the Richard W. Lyman Award for "outstanding achievement in the use of information technology to advance scholarship and teaching in the humanities."


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Displaying 31-45 of 60