Displaying 46-60 of 60

Allan J. Rossman

Allan J. Rossman is Professor of Statistics at Cal Poly – San Luis Obispo and previously taught in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at Dickinson College. His Ph.D. is in Statistics, from Carnegie Mellon University. He is co-author with Beth Chance of the Workshop Statistics series and Investigating Statistical Concepts, Applications, and Methods, both of which adopt an active learning approach to learning introductory statistics. He was Program Chair for the 2007 Joint Statistical Meetings and President of the International Association for Statistical Education from 2007–2009. He serves as Chief Reader for the Advanced Placement program in Statistics. He is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and was one of the recipients of the Mathematical Association of America’s Haimo Award for Distinguished College or University Teaching of Mathematics in 2010.


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Barbara Roswell

Barbara Sherr Roswell teaches at Goucher College, where she has also directed the Writing Program, Writing Across the Curriculum, and the First Year Colloquium. The founding editor of Reflections: A Journal of Writing, Service-Learning and Community Literacy, and coauthor of Reading, Writing, and Gender, her scholarship has appeared in Assessing Writing, Educational Assessment, Writing Center Journal, and the Community Arts Network. She has been instrumental in developing the Baltimore Read A Story--Write A Story after-school program and the college degree program at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women.


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Paula S. Rothenberg

Paula S. Rothenberg is a Senior Fellow at The Murphy Institute, City University of New York and Professor Emerita at William Patterson University of New Jersey.   From 1989 to 2006 she served as Director of The New Jersey Project on Inclusive Scholarship, Curriculum, and Teaching.   She is the author of several books including the autobiographical Invisible Privilege: A Memoir about Race, Class, and Gender.   With Worth Publishers she has auhored four titles--the best-selling Race, Class, and Gender; White Privilege; Beyond Borders; and her newest title What's the Problem? She is also co-editor of a number of anthologies including Creating and Inclusive College Curriculum:  A Teaching Sourcebook from the New Jersey Project and Feminist Frameworks: Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations between Women and Men, one of the first women’s studies texts.   Her articles and essays appear in journals and anthologies across the disciplines and have been widely reprinted.    Her work was instrumental in the creation of women’s studies and multicultural studies as academic disciplines. 


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Annette T. Rottenberg

Annette T. Rottenberg, formerly assistant director of the writing program at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, has taught composition and literature at Chicago City College, SUNY at Buffalo, Duke University, and schools abroad.


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Jacqueline Jones Royster

Jacqueline Jones Royster is Dean of the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts and Professor in the School of Literature, Communication, and Culture at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Among her areas of interest are the rhetorical history of women of African descent and the development of literacy. She has published articles in books and journals on literacy studies and women's studies. She is currently at work on Traces of a Stream: Literacy and Social Change Among African American Women.


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Hannah Rubenstein

Hannah Rubenstein is a writer and editor who has used her academic training in communication (MA, Fairfield University) to guide her collaborations on A Speaker's Guidebook (2010), Public Speaking: Challenges and Choices (1999), and other successful college texts. She heads her own communication firm, Hedgehog Productions.


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William F. Ruddiman

William F.  Ruddiman was initially trained as a marine geologist. His subsequent work over many years has explored several different aspects of the field of paleoclimate. His earliest research was on orbital-scale changes in North Atlantic sediments to reconstruct past sea-surface temperatures and to quantify the deposition of ice-rafted debris. He also studied the way that vertical mixing by sea-floor organisms smoothes deep-sea climatic records. Later, his interests turned to the cause of long-term cooling over the last 50 million years. This research led to a new hypothesis that uplift of the Tibetan Plateau has been a major driver of that cooling, with Maureen Raymo's work on chemical weathering a central part of that hypothesis. That research also demonstrated that Tibetan uplift created much of the seasonally alternating monsoon climate that dominates eastern Asia today. Since entering 'semi-retirement' in 2001, Ruddiman's research has concentrated on the climatic role farmers played during the last several thousand years by clearing land, raising livestock, and irrigating rice padis. This research produced the 'early anthropogenic hypothesis' --- the idea that early agriculturalists caused an anomalous reversal in natural declines of atmospheric CO2 7000 years ago and CH4 5000 years ago. His research on this issue has been NSF-funded for several years. Because this hypothesis has been very controversial, it has provoked many studies seeking ways to test it.


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Todd Ruskell

Todd G. Ruskell is a Teaching Professor in Physics at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) in Golden, CO.

Dr. Ruskell earned a B.A. in Physics at Lawrence University in Appleton, WI, and did his doctoral research on scanning probe microscopy techniques at the University of Arizona.  After two years of post-doctoral research at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, he joined the faculty at CSM in 1999.  Dr. Ruskell specializes in teaching the introductory physics sequence.  He was one of the early adopters of both on-line homework and personal response systems and continues to refine his use of both technologies.  He was also instrumental in developing the curriculum used in the Physics Studio, where introductory physics is taught to all students at CSM.


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John J. Ruszkiewicz

John J. Ruszkiewicz is a professor at the University of Texas at Austin where he has taught literature, rhetoric, and writing for more than thirty-five years. A winner of the President’s Associates Teaching Excellence Award, he was instrumental in creating the Department of Rhetoric and Writing in 1993 and directed the unit from 2001-05. He has also served as president of the Conference of College Teachers of English (CCTE) of Texas, which gave him its Frances Hernández Teacher—Scholar Award in 2012. For Bedford/St. Martin's, he is coauthor, with Andrea Lunsford, of Everything’s An Argument (6th edition, 2013), and the author of How To Write Anything (2nd edition 2012) and A Reader's Guide to College Writing (2014).


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Leigh Ryan

Leigh Ryan has directed the Writing Center at the University of Maryland since 1982.  In addition to articles on mentoring, writing, and writing center theory, practice, and administration, she is the author of The Bedford Guide for Writing Tutors (Fifth Edition, with Lisa Zimmerelli).  She has presented at regional, national, and international writing center and composition conferences.  She has consulted on writing centers at institutions in the United States, South Africa, and the Netherlands.  Former secretary of the International Writing Centers Association and president of the Maryland Association of Teachers of English and Mid-Atlantic Writing Centers Association (MAWCA), she currently serves on the executive board for MAWCA and the planning committee for the IWCA/NCPTW 2010 conference.


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Displaying 46-60 of 60