Displaying 16-30 of 1,048

Alicia Alexander

Dr. Alicia Alexander is the Associate Professor, TA Coordinator, and Basic Course Director at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. Dr. Alexander received her doctorate in interpersonal communication from the University of Texas at Austin. She enjoys teaching courses in family communication, interpersonal communication, public speaking, and communication education. In 2009 she was the recipient of the Teaching Distinction Award, a university-wide teaching award at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.

Dr. Alexander's research interests focus primarily on interpersonal communication among family members and between romantic partners. She is particularly concerned with understanding how people overcome adversity in their relationships through talk and various forms of relationship repair. Her research also focuses on the way people talk about and express their emotions in close relationships. Her latest research centers on communication education and interpersonal communication issues in the classroom. Dr. Alexander has received five "Top Paper" awards at the National Communication and International Communication Association annual conferences for her scholarly work in interpersonal communication. Her research has been published in journals such as Communication Monographs, Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Communication Research, Communication Research Reports, and Communication Teacher.


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Deborah Allen

Deborah Allen is on leave from the University of Delaware to serve in the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education, where she is a Program Director for the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship program, and for the Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological & Mathematical Sciences (UBM), Course, Curriculum & Laboratory Improvement (CCLI), Research Coordination Networks–Undergraduate Biology Education (RCN-UBE), and Scholarships in Science Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) programs. Before joining DUE, Allen served as PI of a NSF-funded Teacher Professional Continuum project, and continues to collaborate with the project's team of science and science education faculty who study pre-service teachers' progress through a reform-based teacher preparation program, and who co-teach courses for students in that program. Allen serves on the editorial board of CBE-Life Sciences Education and has co-authored a regularly-featured column on teaching strategies for that journal. She is the author of Transformations: Approaches to College Science Teaching (W.H. Freeman's Scientific Teaching Series, 2009).


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Robert J. Allison

Robert J. Allison is Professor of History at Suffolk University in Boston and also teaches history at the Harvard Extension School. He graduated from the Harvard Extension School with an ALB before earning a PhD in the History of American Civilization at Harvard in 1992. Allison received the Harvard Extension School's Petra Shattuck Distinguished Teaching Award in 1997, the Suffolk University Student Government Association's Distinguished Faculty Award in 2006, and the Suffolk University Outstanding Faculty Award in 2007.  His books include The Crescent Obscured: The United States and the Muslim World, 1776–1815 (2000); A Short History of Boston (2004); Stephen Decatur, American Naval Hero (2005); The Boston Massacre (2006); The Boston Tea Party (2007); and A Short History of Cape Cod (2010).  For The Teaching Company, he  taped the thirty-six lecture series, “Before 1776:  Life in Colonial America,” (2009). He has edited books on American history spanning from the colonial period to the twentieth century. Allison was a consultant to the Commonwealth Museum at the State Archives in Boston, and he is on the board of overseers of the USS Constitution Museum in Charlestown, Massachusetts. He is vice president of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, an elected fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, and president of the South Boston Historical Society.


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Gerald J. Alred

Gerald J. Alred is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he teaches courses in the Professional Writing Program. He is the author of numerous scholarly articles and several standard bibliographies on business and technical communication, and is a founding member of the editorial board of the Journal of Business and Technical Communication. He is co-author of The Business Writer's Handbook and Handbook of Technical Writing. He is a recipient of the prestigious Jay R. Gould Award for "profound scholarly and textbook contributions to the teaching of business and technical writing."



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Layth Alwan

Layth C. Alwan in Associate Professor of Business Statistics and Operations Management, Sheldon B. Lubar School of Business, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. He received a B.A. in mathematics, B.S. in statistics, M.B.A., and PhD in business statistics/operations management, all from the University of Chicago, and an M.S. in computer science from DePaul University. Professor Alwan is an author of many research articles related to statistical process control and business forecasting. He has consulted for many leading companies on statistical issues related to quality, forecasting, and operations/supply chain management applications. On the teaching front, he is focused on engaging and motivating business students on how statistical thinking and data analysis methods have practical importance in business. He is the recipient of several teaching awards, including Business School Teacher of the Year and Executive M.B.A. Outstanding Teacher of the Year.


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Angelika Amon

ANGELIKA AMON is Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a member of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, and Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. She is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Her laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms that govern chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis and the consequences—aneuploidy—when these mechanisms fail during normal cell proliferation and cancer development. Dr. Amon teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in cell biology and genetics.


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John R. Anderson

John Richard Anderson is Richard King Mellon Professor of Psychology and Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He is known for developing the ACT-R, which is the most widely used cognitive architecture in cognitive science. Anderson was also an early leader in research on intelligent tutoring systems, and computer systems based on his cognitive tutors are currently used by more than 500,000 mathematics students. He has served as President of the Cognitive Science Society, and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. He has received numerous awards including the American Psychological Association's Distinguished Scientific Career Award, the David E. Rumelhart Prize for Contributions to the Formal Analysis of Human Cognition, and the inaugural Dr. A. H. Heineken Prize for Cognitive Science. He is the editor of the Psychological Review.


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David A. Anderson

David Anderson is the Paul G. Blazer Professor of Economics at Centre College.  He received his BA in Economics from the University of Michigan and his MA and PhD in Economics from Duke University. Anderson is a leading authority on AP Economics and speaks regularly at the National AP Economics Teacher Conference, the National AP Conference, and regional AP Economics workshops. He has authored dozens of scholarly articles and ten books, including Cracking the AP Economics Exam, Favorite Ways to Learn Economics, Environmental Economics and Natural Resource Management, Contemporary Economics for Managers, Treading Lightly, and Economics by Example. His research is primarily on economic education, environmental economics, law and economics, and labor economics. Anderson teaches courses in each of these fields and loves teaching introductory economics. He lives in Danville, Kentucky, with his wife and two children.


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David Anderson

David A. Anderson, Associate Professor of Economics at Centre College, and was named the Blazer Associate Professor of Economics in 2001. He holds a B.A. degree from the University of Michigan and M.A. and Ph.D. from Duke University.  Dr. Anderson has expertise in the economics of law, crime, and the environment. He has also published scholarly articles on futures markets, ARCH models, marriage, social insurance, classroom technology, instructional evaluation, childbirth, and dispute resolution, among other topics. His books cover the topics of dispute resolution, environmental economics, active learning, and introductory economics. Dr. Anderson's consulting work includes economic impact studies and expert witness testimony on the value of life and lost earnings.


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Erik Angner

Erik Angner is associate professor of Philosophy, Economics, and Public Policy at George Mason University.


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Susan Anker

Susan Anker (BA, MEd, Boston University) brings a unique perspective to the teaching of the developmental writing course. She taught English and developmental writing before entering college publishing, where she worked for eighteen years: as a sales representative and English/ESL editor at Macmillan Publishing Company; as developmental English/ESL editor, executive editor, and editor in chief at St. Martin’s Press; and as vice president and editor in chief for humanities at Houghton Mifflin Company. In each of these positions, she worked with developmental writing instructors and students, maintaining her early interest in the field.  Since the publication of the first edition of Real Writing in 1998, Anker has traveled extensively to campuses across the country, continuing her conversations with instructors and students and giving workshops and presentations. She believes that the writing course is, for many students, their first, best opportunity to learn the skills they will need to succeed in college and achieve their goals.


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John Archibald

John Archibald teaches linguistics at the University of Calgary, and studies the acquisition of phonology; he has written several books on the subject.


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Displaying 16-30 of 1,048