Displaying 91-105 of 1,044

Jeremy M. Berg

JEREMY M. BERG received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Chemistry from Stanford (where he did research with Keith Hodgson and Lubert Stryer) and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Harvard with Richard Holm. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship with Carl Pabo in Biophysics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Johns Hopkins from 1986 to 1990. He then moved to Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as Professor and Director of the Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, where he remained until 2003. He then became Director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. In 2011, he moved to the University of Pittsburgh where he is now Professor of Computational and Systems Biology and Pittsburgh Foundation Chair and Director of the Institute for Personalized Medicine. He served as President of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from 2011-2013. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He received the American Chemical Society Award in Pure Chemistry (1994) and the Eli Lilly Award for Fundamental Research in Biological Chemistry (1995), was named Maryland Outstanding Young Scientist of the Year (1995), received the Harrison Howe Award (1997), and received public service awards from the Biophysical Society, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the American Chemical Society, and the American Society for Cell Biology. He also received numerous teaching awards, including the W. Barry Wood Teaching Award (selected by medical students), the Graduate Student Teaching Award, and the Professor’s Teaching Award for the Preclinical Sciences. He is coauthor, with Stephen J. Lippard, of the textbook Principles of Bioinorganic Chemistry.


Visit Author's Page »

Kathleen Stassen Berger

Kathleen Stassen Berger completed her undergraduate education at Stanford University and Radcliffe College, earned her M.A.T. from Harvard University and an M.S. and Ph.D. from Yeshiva University. Her broad range of experience as an educator includes directing a preschool, teaching philosophy and humanities at the United Nations International School, teaching child and adolescent development to graduate students at Fordham University, teaching inmates earning paralegal degrees at Sing Sing Prison, and teaching undergraduates at both Montclair State University and Quinnipiac University. She has also been involved in education as the president of Community School Board in District Two in Manhattan. 

For over three decades, Berger has taught human development at Bronx Community College of the City University of New York. The students Kathleen Berger teaches every year come from diverse ethnic, economic, and educational backgrounds representing a wide range of interests and consistently honor her with the highest teaching evaluations.

Berger’s developmental texts are currently being used at nearly 700 colleges and universities in a dozen countries and in five languages. Kathleen’s research interests include adolescent identity, sibling relationships, and bullying. As the mother of four daughters, as well as a new grandmother, she brings to her teaching and writing ample firsthand experience with human development.


Visit Author's Page »

Arnold Berk

Arnold Berk is Professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics and a member of the Molecular Biology Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Berk is also a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is one of the original discoverers of RNA splicing and of mechanisms for gene control in viruses. His laboratory studies the molecular interactions that regulate transcription nitiation in mammalian cells, focusing particular attention on transcription factors encoded by oncogenes and tumor suppressors. He teaches introductory courses in molecular biology and virology and an advanced course in cell biology of the nucleus.


Visit Author's Page »

Laurence D. Berkley

Laurence Berkley is an Assistant Professor and Chief Reader in the English Department at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York. He received his Bachelor's Degree from Boston University, his Master's Degree from Columbia University, and his Ph. D. from New York University.


Visit Author's Page »

Peter Berkow

Nationally recognized producer, teacher, and writer Peter Berkow has interviewed hundreds of people about writing, and has produced public television projects ranging from entertainment to education. In addition to being an Emmy-award winning television producer, Berkow, an English Composition specialist at Shasta College in Redding, California, was recognized in 2001 as the nation's leading distance learning college professor with the ITC Award for Outstanding Distance Learning Faculty.


Visit Author's Page »

Stephen A. Bernhardt

Stephen A. Bernhardt is Professor of English and the Andrew B. Kirkpatrick Chair in Writing at the University of Delaware, where he teaches composition, grammar, and technical writing. His professional interests include computers in composition/distance education, writing across the curriculum, professional and technical communication, and visual rhetoric. He has also taught at New Mexico State University and at Southern Illinois University. The author of many journal articles and technical reports, Bernhardt is also the author of Writing at Work (1997) and coeditor of Expanding Literacies: English Teaching and the New Workplace (1998). Bernhardt designed the research plan and reworked content for Writer's Help.


Visit Author's Page »

Andrew Berry

Andrew Berry is Lecturer in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and an undergraduate advisor in the Life Sciences at Harvard University. He teaches in Harvard’s first-year Life Sciences program, as well as courses on evolution and Darwin. His research interests are in evolutionary biology and the history of science. He has coauthored two books: Infinite Tropics, a collection of the writings of Alfred Russel Wallace, and DNA: The Secret of Life, which is part history, part exploration of the controversies swirling around DNA-based technology. 


Visit Author's Page »

Jay Bhattacharya

Jay Bhattacharya is an Associate Professor at Stanford University, School of Medicine, USA.


Visit Author's Page »

Paul R. Bierman

Paul Bierman has been a professor of Geology and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont since 1993. His research and teaching expertise focus on the interaction of people and Earths dynamic surface. Bierman is a native of Baltimore, Maryland. For college, he moved north to Massachusetts, where he earned a bachelors degree in Geology at Williams College. After several years working as an environmental consultant in Boston, Bierman moved north again to the University of Washington in Seattle where he earned both a masters and doctoral degree in Geology. After a short post-doctoral interlude far to the south in Australia, Bierman has been a professor at the University of Vermont since 1993.

Bierman's research has taken him around the globe. He has studied erosion in Australia, South America, and several countries in Africa and the Middle East. In Greenland, Bierman and his graduate students are tracing the history of the Greenland Ice sheet over the last million years, an adventure that repeatedly takes them helicoptering over the ice. In Vermont, New Hampshire, and New York, Bierman and his students created the first record of storminess and erosion that extended back over the last 10,000 years how many of the past megastorms they identified were hurricanes?

Bierman works extensively communicating science to the pubic. He teaches summer science programs for highly motivated high school students, directs a public web site (www.uvm.edu/landscape) holding over 70,000 photographs of historic Vermont landscapes, has been co-author since 2005 of Pipkin et al., an introductory Environmental Geology textbook, and is the lead author of a new, NSF-funded textbook, Key Concepts in Geomorphology, that uses extensive visuals and photographs to teach about the workings of Earths surface.


Visit Author's Page »

Andrew Biewener

Andrew Biewener is the Charles P. Lyman Professor of Biology in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University, and Director of the Concord Field Station. He teaches introductory and advanced courses in anatomy, physiology, and biomechanics. His research focuses on the comparative biomechanics and neuromuscular control of mammalian and avian locomotion, with relevance to biorobotics. He is currently Deputy Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Experimental Biology. He also served as President of the American Society of Biomechanics.


Visit Author's Page »

George Athan Billias

Founding editors of Interpretations of American History Gerald N. Grob and George Athan Billias are Sigerist Professor of the History of Medicine Emeritus at Rutgers University and Hyatt Professor of History Emeritus at Clark University, respectively.


Visit Author's Page »

Patricia Bizzell

Patricia Bizzell (PhD, Rutgers University) is Reverend John E. Brooks, S. J. Professor of Humanities at the College of the Holy Cross. With Bruce Herzberg she has published Negotiating Difference (Bedford/St. Martin's, 1996), and with Bruce Herzberg and Nedra Reynolds, The Bedford Bibliography for Teachers of Writing, Fifth Edition (Bedford/St. Martin's, 2000).


Visit Author's Page »

David F. Bjorklund

David F. Bjorklund, Ph.D., is a Professor of Psychology at Florida Atlantic University, where he has taught graduate and undergraduate courses in developmental and evolutionary psychology since 1976. He received a BA degree in Psychology from the University of Massachusetts in 1971, an MA degree in Psychology from the University of Dayton in 1973, and a Ph.D. degree in Developmental Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1976. He has received numerous teaching and research awards from Florida Atlantic University, and is the recipient of an Alexander von Humboldt Research Award. He served as Associate Editor of Child Development (1997-2001) and is currently serving as Editor of the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. He has served on the editorial boards of numerous journals and also served as a contributing editor to Parents Magazine. He has published more than 170 scholarly articles on various topics relating to child development and evolutionary psychology and has received financial support for his research from the National Science Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, and the German Research Foundation. His other books include Children's Thinking: Cognitive Development and Individual Differences, now in its fifth edition; Why Youth is Not Wasted on the Young; Looking at Children: An Introduction to Child Development (with Barbara Bjorklund); Parents Book of Discipline (with Barbara Bjorklund); Applied Child Study (with Anthony Pellegrini); The Origins of Human Nature: Evolutionary Developmental Psychology (with Anthony Pellegrini); Children's Strategies: Contemporary Views of Cognitive Development; False-Memory Creation in Children and Adults: Theory, Research, and Implications; and Origins of the Social Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and Child Development (edited with Bruce Ellis). His current research interests include children’s cognitive development and evolutionary developmental psychology. He lives in Jupiter, Florida, with his wife Barbara, and enjoys traveling, cooking, playing basketball, and kayaking.


Visit Author's Page »

Displaying 91-105 of 1,044